Stacie Smith asked in SportsRunning · 2 months ago

Calves hurt extremely bad after running for an hour everyday for like 4-5 days. Help! ?

My legs hurt really bad. I don’t know if I over did it. But I can barely walk. My calves look swollen almost. Is this bad?? 

My right calf always would hurt and be slightly bigger than my left one. I would measure it by cupping my hands around and see. 

I always wanted to go to the doctor to see if I have a clogged vein or something. 

But are my legs so sore from running probably? Is it bad that my calves seem to be swollen? 

I want small calves and read running will make them smaller but I think I overdid it. I know I won’t see results right away. I see weight loss everywhere else except for my calves. So weird and annoying. 

What could be the reason????? 

6 Answers

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, you are likely overdoing it.

    I assume you suddenly started running for an hour every day.  That's risky: It increases the probability that you will be injured. When you start running, you should do easy workouts, and gradually increase the amount of time of your workouts.

    I'm not qualified to say what might have caused the swelling.

    However, one rare injury is muscle compression syndrome, also known as compartment syndrome. The muscles in your calves can swell, but swelling is constrained by fascia. This results in the swollen muscles pressing arteries and nerves. This results in reduced blood flow to the foot. In a  severe case, this can require emergency surgery to relieve pressure.

    I don't believe cupping your hands around your calves is an accurate way to compare sizes. I would use a tape measure, but even that requires some care to be accurate.

    I don't think you have to worry about your calves being different sizes.  It's common to have parts on one side of the body be different in size than their counterparts on the other side. However, if the size has noticeably changed in the last few days, you might be justified in worrying.

    What you read about running reducing the size of your calves might be wrong. 

    As an effective means of burning calories, endurance sports, such as distance running, can be part of a weight management program, and help you lose fat. But, you cannot spot reduce: The parts of your body that lose fat the most will not be correlated to the parts of your body you exercise the most. Those parts of your body that give up fat the fastest might be different from others who do the same workouts you do. It may be your calves will give up fat quickly. It may be they give up fat slowly.

    If your calves do not have fat in them, don't try to reduce them. To do that, you would have to limit dietary protein to an unhealthful level. Also, the rule against spot reducing applies to protein loss.

    You can, however, use strength training exercises to improve muscle tone. As with running, you should start with easy: Use light weights that allow you to do 20 reps. Gradually increase the weight until you are limited to about 8 reps. Avoid  heavy weights that limit you to a few reps, as this can help you increase muscle mass in areas you exercise.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Running is hard on the body. 

  • 4 weeks ago

    Hi Stacey,

    It does sound like a case of too much too soon.

    You don't say how often you've been running before you started running an hour a day. But it may help if you:

    * Stop for a couple of days & then build up gradually

    * Make sure you have decent running shoes - not too worn/old

    * Warm-up before you run

    * Cool down & stretch after each run

    * Foam roll &/or self massage your calf muscles regularly

    * Do some strength training too

  • Linda
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    You are working out your legs too much from running more than your body can handle it. Run for less time each day or limit running to once or twice per week and let your calves fully rest and allow the swelling to go down before you try again. Also, do you do stretches before running and a cool down afterwards? That might help along with some good b vitamins.

    • Stacie Smith
      Lv 4
      2 months agoReport

      I stretch afterwards and cool down afterwards. I don’t stretch before. Should I ??

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  • 2 months ago

    Your body is talking to you, so better listen to it. Taking some magnesium might help you, but what you really need is REST. Your body isn't a machine, it takes care to function well.

  • 2 months ago

    You need to slow down and take more rest.

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