what does "passel" mean in this sentence?

“I’m going to show them this time. I’m going to put a passel on that horse Diamond, and bring home the whole acre.”

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  • 4 weeks ago

    'Passel' is a mispronunciation of 'parcel', and in this context it means 'a large amount; a heap'.

    The speaker is planning to bet a large amount of money on the horse named Diamond, and is hoping to win enough to buy back some land.

  • Mike
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    a slew................................

    • Mike
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      nay, nay.................

  • 4 weeks ago

    I don't quite get how it fits, but a passel is a western dialect slang used to mean "a large amount", lots of, a load of.

    • It fits because it means "a large amount OF MONEY." He's going to bet a sh*tload of money on that horse.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    "A passel" just means "a lot." I always thought it was old American slang, like something you'd hear in cowboy movies, but maybe it goes back farther than that.

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  • Bill B
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    The quotation in question is from "The Water Dancer."

    A passel is something large and is probably a bastardization of parcel.

    The person is saying "They'll see what happens. I'm putting a large wager on the horse Diamond and win big. Really big & then they will envy me because I am rich."

  • John P
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    In 70 years in Britain and Australia I have not come across "passel" and my British spell-checker does not recognise it. My large dictionary says that it is "mainly USA".

    The quotation seems to mean that he is going to bet a lot of money on a horse called Diamond, and thus hope to gain a lot of money, possibly in order to buy some land, maybe for farming. But note that "the whole acre" might be an American expression with meaning beyond an acre (half a hectare) of land.

    • RE
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      I think it's a variant of parcel, as in "A Passel of Rogues." I agree that it means a lot of money, probably winning enough to buy an acre of land.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Well this is what I understood

    Passel means a large group of people or things.

    Meaning he is going to put a lot of diamonds from an acre of farm or land on his horse and come back this time for sure.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Passel is another word for parcel or packet - and thinking of the British expression about something 'costing a packet' it could mean he is going off with a load of money to secure the deal. Putting money on a horse can also mean make a wager.

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