Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 4 weeks ago

Is "indiscernible difference" a phrase often used by native speakers?

Is "indiscernible difference" a phrase often used by native speakers?

If not, what phrase is often used instead?

7 Answers

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  • 4 weeks ago
    Best Answer

    No, it is not. What a mouthful. Native speakers would be more blunt and simply say "No difference". "Indiscernible difference" is meaningless drivel.

  • John P
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    No, in 70 years in Britain and Australia I have never come across "indiscernible difference". But "discernible difference" is in occasional use, meaning not a huge difference, but one which can be noted.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Something almost makes no difference.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    As has been noted, "indiscernible" is not a synonym for "little." I think "unnoticeable" and "undetectable" are used more often that "indiscernible."

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    I don't think so. One would be no significant difference.

  • 4 weeks ago

    No. I would say "little difference" instead. 2 syllables instead of 5.

  • Nancy
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    "Often," no. But if there's a difference but nobody can tell the difference and one wanted an adjective to put before "difference" to describe that situation, then "indiscernible" is the adjective one would probably use.

    I mean, you could use familiar phrasings like "little difference" (It makes little difference.), "insignificant difference" (It's an insignificant difference.), or "negligible difference" (It's a negligible difference. -- The difference is negligible.), but those don't quite mean the same thing because they don't actually say that one can't tell the difference, only that it's small, meaningless, or able to be overlooked, respectively.

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