can landlord terminate lease without written notice?

Update:

Malfunction of a fan in ceiling caused a burst pipe. Flooding took place. Landlord said it was uninhabitable. In my lease It stated " If we believe fire or catastrophic damage is substantial or that performance of needed repairs poses a danger to you, we may terminate your tenancy within a reasonable amount of time by giving you written notice. If your tenancy is so terminated, we will refund prorated rent and all deposits, less lawful deductions. Never received written notice or refund.

Update 2:

Please see edit of problem below. I want to add that my lease still had 6 months left, When I saw my apartment being advertised and available I told Landlord I wanted my apartment back. She said that whatever is on their website did not concern me. She said information on website was only for new residents and she had no control of website. Now I felt I am being discriminated against and I still did not receive any refunds.

17 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Too bad. They owe you nothing. Learn the difference between the words "may" and "shall". They may... makes it optional. They shall... means that they "will" do it. They owe you nothing.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience & with Landlord & Tenant law experience.
    • Sass3 weeks agoReport

      Thank you for your answer but the fact remains whether "may" or "shall" was used they exercised the option to terminate my lease. They wanted me to sign a new lease and I never got written notice nor my refund. Since you mentioned your experience I have 36 years as an educator...I'm just saying

  • nanu
    Lv 5
    3 weeks ago

    no.......................................

  • Dan B
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    No. Written notice is required in all instances of termination, renewal or non-renewal by both parties. The lease can be terminated early by your landlord if you don't live by the lease terms. It's calledf an eviction - requires a court order. The LL does not have to allow you to renew your lease. That's not an eviction.

    • Sass3 weeks agoReport

      Thank you for your comment. My lease still had 6 months left and I saw my apartment being advertised. When I asked landlord about that she said information on website is for new residents only and she has no control of website

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    As you can see from these answers, you left this way too vague. Why was it terminated? State laws sometimes apply, but what's most important is the wording in the lease. I can think of several valid reasons why a landlord would terminate a lease. I can also think of reasons that wouldn't hold up in most courts.

    Gotta give us something to work with.

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    3 weeks ago

    In most states NO! but you need check with an attorney in that state to be sure, plus read the lease agreement. He may of given himself that right in the lease.

  • R P
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Probably not, but you need to google and read the landlord laws for your area to find your answer.

    Source(s): FL landlord
  • 3 weeks ago

    No but he can still evict you if you break the lease or don't pay the rent (probably little or no notice required for those).

    • SimplytheFACTS
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      typically still need to give written cure/pay or quit notice, but there are exceptions to that

  • 3 weeks ago

    No, nor can he just decide to terminate it with written notice.

    • SimplytheFACTS
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      in most states, yes if the lease is expired and just terminate it w written notice

  • 3 weeks ago

    Not in any state in the US. Even when there is no written lease (which is required for tenancies of one year or more), a month to month agreement requires notice to either party from the other that the agreement is ending at the expiration of the notice period.

    In rare cases, a situation can create a de facto termination without notice - such as when the property is suddenly destroyed. The tenant is out with no place to go without any fault on the landlord's part. Total loss by fire, flood, tornado, hurricane....

  • 3 weeks ago

    I would hope so. what if he needed to live there for financial reasons. It's his property.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      The landlord has GIVEN UP the right to "live there" when he signed the lease, which gives the tenant the exclusive right to live there, subject to mutually agreed conditions for early termination, which must also accord with the state laws.

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