Donald Chump asked in PetsHorses · 4 weeks ago

How do you feel about race horses being shot when they're no longer fit to run?

Would yo pay to look after one?

11 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago
    Best Answer

    Well, they very rarely recover. It's humane in that they would otherwise suffer for the rest of their natural lives. So I agree with it. However, I disagree with horse racing, it shouldn't have to happen in the first place.

    • zephania666
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      I've known horses that never raced  break legs in their own safe pastures, just playing around.  It happens.

      Most racers retire because age slows them down, or an injury needs a long layoff, or they don't have the will to race.  

      NOT because of catastrophic breakdown.

  • Anonymous
    6 days ago

    I feel like some people merely use  horses as machines and when their 'finished' their put down. I understand this is not the case with the majority of racing folks and I respect their sport. However racing should have higher safety levels. Ex racers should be able to enjoy a home as a companion or be retrained and rehabilitated.

  • patty
    Lv 5
    7 days ago

    people involved in horse racing are money hungry and greedy

  • Blonde
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    I’ve heard former race horses are hard to domesticate. All they know is racing. I am the type of person who feels it’s ok to put down unwanted animals...their lives are void of love and attention and they suffer in that.

    • zephania666
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      In some ways, they're better than other horses - they aren't easily spooked by tractors or crowds or clatter, they've been trailered extensively, they're used to being handled by multiple people, getting regular farrier care and near daily vet visits..  

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  • 3 weeks ago

    "shot" what are you talking about? Just a troll.

    • zephania666
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      Those horse are treated well, if only because they don't run well if they're not in great health.  Of course, they're treated well for many other reasons, but no doubt that's the only one you'll believe.

  • John
    Lv 4
    3 weeks ago

    I can't think of a single owner that actually owns horses doing that unless the horse was in pain and dying and could not take anesthesia (pain killers).

    There are assholes out there but they own cars not horses

    • zephania666
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      https://www.ridewithequo.com/the-horse-industry-by-the-numbers/

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Well, in nature, old horses are culled by the fangs of carnivores, or starvation. Culling them with bullets to the brain is far more humane than the natural alternative.

    • zephania666
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      One third of racehorses are over 5.  Many 8-10 year olds race consistently, and there have been 15 year olds that won stakes races.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Racehorses are not shot when they're no longer fit to run in the US.

    At worst, in the event of a breakdown, they might be humanely euthanized.

    Many used to go to slaughter, but now most racetracks regulate that. You cannot run or stable a horse there without signing papers agreeing the horse will not go to slaughter. If found out, you lose all rights to run or stable there. Admittedly, some tracks are better at enforcement than others, but things are improving mightily.

    Some tracks even have Horse Adoption Centers to rehome them right on the track grounds - Fingerlakes Race Track in western New York state is one that does.

    Other times, the owners and/or trainers send those no longer going to run to organizations that do nothing but racehorse re-homings. The horses are donated to them, or bought at auction cheaply, fixed up, calmed down, trained, and adopted out to approved homes.

    I personally have owned four former racehorsees, three straight off the track. I still own two of them (the others died of natural and unpreventable causes). They're great horses, but not for beginners, and need an experienced hand when they first come off the track.

    I feel the industry is getting better and better at rehoming retired racehorses, and though some of course still fall through the cracks, they do better than most animal industries. I think the racehorse folks do better at this now, than most segments do. The horses are very versatile, very useful, and available for pennies on what you'd spend for an equivalent horse in other disciplines. Often, if you're known at the track, you can get them free because they know you're able to retrain them and will give or get them a good long term home.

    • zephania666
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      I own ex-racehorses, all of my horse owning friends own one or more of them.  These horses find good homes after racing..  

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Both you and Star are total ignoramuses when it comes to horse racing. That much is obvious from your question and from his response. Race horses on the whole get care that far exceeds what most regular horse owners are able to provide. Yes, they generally live in stalls 24/7, but they are kept as comfortable as possible. They get plenty of hay, the best feed that money can buy, and they are groomed and attended to multiple times every day. Racehorses also enjoy the benefit of getting care from professionals that most pleasure horse owners can't afford, such as dentists, vets, chiropractors, massage therapists, top notch professional farriers, and so forth. They are never left unattended, even at 2AM... all tracks employ security people and night watchmen to keep an eye on things after dark every night of the year.

    With this said, I will say that it is exceedingly RARE for a racehorse to be killed with a gun, even if he or she breaks down catastrophically during or following a race. The great majority of the time, the horse is destroyed by chemical means, as in euthanasia. This makes the "meat" unusable as feed, either for other animals or for people, contrary to popular myths. Euthanasia solution is TOXIC, you two. If it can kill an animal the size of most horses, it can and WILL KILL other ANIMALS AND

    PEOPLE, too. Remember that the next time you go thinking that racehorses end up as dog food at the end of their careers. One other little note about this which is neither here nor there: The drugs used in animal euthanasia are EXACTLY the same drugs used to execute criminals by lethal injection. The only thing that changes is the dosage and the route of administration. The drugs themselves do not.

    As for whether or not I'd ever buy or adopt an ex-racehorse, the answer is that it depends on the animal's health and physical condition, as well as on his or her personality. I currently live on a farm with 5 horses, and of the five, 3 are ex racehorses that were retired. The racing industry, and racetracks, are a major source of horses for other sports, such as show jumping, eventing, dressage, polo, and a long list of others. There are also many other breeds of horses which have been improved or strengthened by the introduction and use of Thoroughbred stallions.

    There are also numerous rescue and retirement organizations around which specialize in finding homes for retired racehorses. You may have heard of a couple of them, in fact. CANTER is perhaps the best known.

    Being retired from the track isn't necessarily a death sentence for a horse. The most successful horses usually go on to have second careers, either as breeding stock or as riding horses in other sports.

    PS: Without the Thoroughbred, and without racing, we wouldn't have many other breeds that America is famous for, such as the Standard Bred (the horses that race in harness and pull sulkies), the American Saddlebred ( this breed's ancestors were primarily TB's and Arabs) the Morgan horse ( Justin Morgan, the breed's foundation sire, had TB genes) and perhaps most important of all, the American Quarter Horse.

    • Starlight 1
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      There is even one show jumper named Quantum Leap who is a half brother to Secretariat. He was bred for the track too, but was sold for riding when it turned out that he couldn't run. Then one of our top show jumper riders discovered him and trained him, and they ended up in the Olympics together.

  • 4 weeks ago

    I don't care. There's nothing I can do. Nothing any one can do since the industry is far, far too large and powerful.

    The horse is rarely shot any more. They are killed via an injection when they break a leg so severely it can't be fixed or have a break down on the track. Usually the horse is killed in an insurance scheme

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