What is what We see above in the space by night?

Space, i am not sure if we called it sky by the day and space by the night.

whatever, if it is supposed that the light last several lightyears to arrive into our eyes so, what exactly do we see at night in the outer space?

I see stars under the Black Cloak of the night, BUT due the distance i should not be able to watch any star, because the Light is traveling i guess, and for the time that the light reaches my eyes, the star is already gone.

I can not assume that We see a very old picture that have been traveling by thousand of years...because the Frame is missing. :(

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  • 3 weeks ago
    Best Answer

    >>What is what We see above in the space by night?

    >>Space, i am not sure if we called it sky by the day and space by the night. 

    Actually, the view is the same... only, the blue of our daylight sky is the effect of the Sun's light being scattered, which drowns out the dim stars in the brilliant blue of the sky. 

    The effect is the same at night, only, there's far *less* light to scatter - so, we see the black of space, and the stars' light which arrives on Earth. 

    >>whatever, if it is supposed that the light last several lightyears

    >>to arrive into our eyes so, what exactly do we see at night in 

    >>the outer space? 

    We see the light that *left* that star some time ago... we see the sun as it was 8 1/3 minutes ago, but we see the nearest stars as they were a few *years* ago.  Most the stars we see with our eyes at night are within a few hundred light years, so we're seeing them as they were a few hundred years ago. 

    >>I see stars under the Black Cloak of the night, BUT due the distance

    >>i should not be able to watch any star, because the Light is traveling 

    >>i guess, and for the time that the light reaches my eyes, the star 

    >>is already gone. 

    While that's *possible*... most the stars in our neighborhood that you see with your eyes are very likely still there.  There are a few exceptions - like Betelgeuse, in the shoulder of Orion - that may be gone, but we may not know about it yet because the 'news' of the event is traveling to Earth at the speed of light - and it hasn't reached us yet...

    >>I can not assume that We see a very old picture that have been 

    >>traveling by thousand of years...because the Frame is missing. :(

    No frame is necessary... or, you can interpret it in that the frame is invisible. And, it works both ways - anyone on any world circling the stars we see will have to wait for the light from our sun to reach them in the same amount of time.  So, wave at someone out there today - they may not see your friendly wave for dozens to maybe hundreds of years...

    • Hansel3 weeks agoReport

      Your answer is exelent.
      Looking another sources i found out that we all see the spectre of the light that it had been traveling for thousand of years to come over herr in our planet present.
      The spectre of the light seem to be the good answer, thank you so much, you help me to understans my question

  • 3 weeks ago

    similar to the inside of a dome, incubator shield..  shhhhhhhhh, don't tell anyone you heard it from me..  

  • 3 weeks ago

    We see stars as they were thousands of years ago because it takes light that long to reach us. We see some galaxies as they were billions of years ago. They might not even exist now.

    • Hansel3 weeks agoReport

      I was investigating and we see the spectre of the light no necesary stars and no answer convince me.

  • 3 weeks ago

    That would be Stars and Planets My Friend

    • Hansel3 weeks agoReport

      Nop, we see the spectre of the light, there aint no stars over there, probably yes but in their moment and place around where gravity is spining sycronize but no now in our present time in our planet, we just watch the spectre of the light.

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  • John
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    During the day you see the atmosphere, lit up by the sun and the diffusion of it's light, which makes the sky blue. At night that effect goes away and you see space and the stars

  • Clive
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Goodness knows what you are talking about as it isn't even in comprehensible English.

    But yes, light takes time to travel so what you see of a star that is X light years away is how it was X years ago. Which is probably no different from now as stars last for billions of years.

    • Hansel3 weeks agoReport

      No answer convince me so, it take me time but i found the answer.
      We see the spectre of the light in our time and present in our planet but the stars we all see, they are not over there anymore, that happens thousands of years ago when these stars were in the position we all see in our present.

  • 3 weeks ago

    It is called "sky" day and night.

    If you look at a star that is located at a thousand light-years, then it means the light took a thousand years to reach your eyes. When the light left that star, it does not care about Earth's rotation or even what we eat for breakfast a thousand years later. It just travels along the shortest path in a direction... unti it hits something. If you see it, then it means that it hit your eye.

    Star life is measured in billions of years. All the stars we can see with our naked eyes are less that a few thousand light-years away (and most are a lot closer than that). A thousand years, in the life of an average star, is like 4 minutes in the life of the average human.

    "How can I recognize him? The picture I have is 4 minutes old! He might be totally different by now."

    The probability that a single one of the visible stars is already gone, is extremely small. It is "possible" but not probable.

    Our Sun is already 5 billion years old and it is expected to continue its peaceful existence for another 5 billion (5 thousand million). A thousand years ago, the Sun looked a lot like now; a thousand years from now, the Sun will still look the same as now. In another 5 billion years, THEN it will begin to look different, becoming first a red giant, then a white dwarf that will continue to shine for yet another 10 billion years.

    Our planet is less than 9 light-minutes from the Sun.

    Earth is a small speck in a Solar system that has a diameter of a little over 2 light-years.

    Our Solar system is a small speck in a Galaxy that has over a quarter trillion stars.

    250 000 000 000 000 stars (approx.)

    Our Galaxy is one of roughly 50 galaxies in the Local Group.

    The Local Group has 3 large spiral galaxies (our Galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy, the Triangulum galaxy, plus forty-ish dwarf galaxies).

    The Local Group has a width of 10 million light-years.

    And so on.

    The stars you see in the sky are your neighbors. They are the houses next to yours, on your street. There are, at best, only 6,000 stars that are visible to the naked eye and, even the ones that are thousands of light-years away are very probably (99.999%) still around today.

    • Hansel3 weeks agoReport

      Good answer and i was looking for another resources and what we see is the spectre of the light in our present time, these stars were over there in that position thousand of years ago but until now in our planet and present time are able to watch them all.
      Thank you for your answer.

  • poldi2
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    The stars we see in the night sky are probably not gone. Stars last for millions to billions of years, and the stars we see in our night sky are all within a few thousand light years. So the stars that emitted the light we see today are probably still there. They have not changed in such a short time.

    Its like seeing someone you know a week after you last saw them - they haven't changed much.

    • Hansel3 weeks agoReport

      The right answer is The Spectre of the light that it had been traveling several thousand of years to come over here in our present planet.
      Greetings.

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