Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 month ago

Would the magnet between the earth and the sun ever break?

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  • 1 month ago
    Best Answer

    Are you talking about the magnetic fields of the Sun and Earth? If that's the case, eventually, yes. The "magnet" between the Earth and Sun will break when the Sun dies, or Earth gets destroyed when the Sun becomes a Red Giant.(look it up if you don't know what it is.) Even then the Earth might still exist, just without any life on it. This will take BILLIONS of years to happen however. If you're talking about the gravitational forces, no. The interaction of the Sun's gravity and the Earth's will never cease. Every object in the Universe has gravity, no matter how small. This interaction will go on for an indefinite amount of time. Hope this was helpful!

  • 1 month ago

    How I love Black holes...

  • 1 month ago

    No, If they have mass there is gravity. It is not magnetism.

  • oubaas
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It will happen for sure ...but by billion years

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  • 1 month ago

    No, but Earth CAN lose its GLOBAL magnetic field like Mars has when enough of the outer liquid core cools off and crystallizes. Mats still has large regional magnetic anomalies. So does Earth.

    Magnetic fields do not "break." The polarity and strength of magnetic field can and does decrease. That has been happening to Earth's magnetic field for decades. The magnetic polarity will flip, but I may take thousands of years to happen. It HAS happened many times before.

    Gravity and magnetism are 2 different forces. Magnetism does NOT keep Earth in orbit around the Sun. 

  • Vaman
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    There is no magnet between the Sun and Earth. The Earth has the molten core which is a very good conductor. When it spins it produces the magnetic field. Similarly the Sun and stars. Therefore, these magnetic fields are almost permanent.

  • 1 month ago

    Where exactly is this 'magnet' located at? floating in space?

    • M.
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      It's out in a field somewhere

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    If it does we're screwed

  • 1 month ago

    Not without a greater gravitational force acting against Sol.

  • marty
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you're talking about the gravitational pull that keeps the earth in its orbit, there is a possibility, however low, of Earth breaking free from Sun's gravitational field and drifting off to space if it attained a velocity greater than or equal to the escape velocity. Escape velocity is the speed at which the sum of the energies (kinetic and gravitational potential energy) is equal to zero.

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