Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 4 weeks ago

So in World War II, why were Japanese-Americans allowed to join the U.S. Army if they were considered the enemy? Am I missing something here?

6 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Yes you are missing something.

  • equal
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    there is a dilemma the USA is populated by diversity it has many roots who is the enemy ? the old country is the enemy who do you love the most 243 years is not yet up rooted how do you know who is loyal to who its a hard decision is trust

  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    I thought they were interned in camps.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Japanese Americans had already had an establish record of service in the US military by the time WW2 came around, as Japanese migrants tended to push their sons into service as a means to get ahead. Following the start of the war, J/A's from Hawaii were viewed as more trust worthy, while mainland J/A's were reluctant to fight since they were being locked up. But the US needed as many bodies as they could throw at the enemy, along with people who could actually speak the enemy's language, so accepting J/A's became more standard.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    You're missing the word "American". More often than not, Japanese-Americans were either sent to fight in Europe or had stateside assignments, like translations or listening outposts.

    BTW, Many German-Americans served in our military also.

    • Tim D
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      The "many millions" are you sure?

  • Jamey
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Japanese-American means they have American citizenship so how is that confusing.

    • Kid Mohawk
      Lv 4
      4 weeks agoReport

      During WW2, the majority of Japanese-Americans were rounded up and placed into camps by the US Government.

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