Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 1 month ago

How do I legally break contract with my breeder.?

I am currently a co-owner of a dog and the breeder gets three breeds out of my dog but she is responsible for all veting well my dog is pregnant and nursing the pups.

I paid over $600 in vet bills and I have not yet been reimbursed and every time I ask she makes up excuses but yet she is going out buying more dogs.

So how do I or can I break the contract with her?

12 Answers

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  • Best Answer

    If you have the contract and you have documentation that demonstrates that she is in violation of the contract, then you need to talk to an attorney. This is what attorneys do. They handle contracts. They'll give her an official chance, in writing, to fulfill her end of the contract and if she fails or refuses to do so, then she'll be in breach and you can get the contract nullified.

  • 1 month ago

    What does this contract say exactly ? Your typing isn't very clear, and it makes no sense to keep a dog for 3 breeding's and give up all the puppies. 

    Remember that you have a Free dog, in your own words, you have to work to repay this breeder. You had a litter of puppies, is she keeping all the puppies - or are you guys splitting them ? What Vet bill was this $600 ? OFA and a Check up ? 

    Seems like you got yourself into something you aren't prepared to finalize the deal.. maybe give the dog back to her and demand the $600 back.. then go buy a dog to be your pet. 

    Source(s): Mentor Breeder
  • 1 month ago

    Talk to your lawyer:::::

  • Jack H
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Just out of interest, what breed is your dog supposed to be ? How many pups are there in the average litter? How much would it have cost you to buy her outright? It seems to be a crazy deal to make. I wish you the best of luck, remember, a verbal deal is nearly impossible to enforce by both parties, unless she's going to *send the boys round*...

    • Lisa1 month agoReport

      Chocolate lab, her first letter had six pups. She was originally selling her for $1,000.
      She originally came to me and offered me the dog for free if I would be a guardian home and allowed her to breed the dog three times.

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  • 1 month ago

    For starters, don't part with ANY of these puppies. Secondly if this is an AKC situation, they should be involved. If this is not and the puppies are not able to be AKC registered (?) then you have to get a lawyer to sort out this mess.

    THIS is why I never went into a co-ownership, other than once when I had to home a puppy we'd bred after he started fighting with his uncle. He went on a co-ownership with a girl recommended by a fellow-breeder but ONLY because I wanted to make sure he was going to the home I wanted to feel ok with because he was an older dog. After a while with her, I had him transferred into her sole name.

    It's all too often messy to get into co-ownerships although obviously there are cases, lots in the US, where this works, especially with a successful dog who is being campaigned - a sharing of costs.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Without reading the contract there is no way to know its terms and conditions.

    It's that simple.

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    As the contract is a legal document, you make sure you have everything in writing, so your vets bill and a certified letter asking the breeder to pay the vet bill as per contract, giving them say 14 days to pay, all dated etc, that way you have the proof you need to sue for breach of contract and potentially get it thrown out........ the reality is you have abreeders contract, so you have a pet that you look after/feed/pay for and the breeder keeps the breed potential/litter as KC will register 3 litters only then the breeder will ask you or they will get the dog spayed... it is just a contract where the breeder keeps control and you buy a pet you pay everything apart from vet bills for breed purposes for

    • E. H. Amos
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      So she is running a PUPPY MILL thru you; forcing you to house & breed the puppies & bear the expenses - all in order to own a dog. BAD DEAL! If it is only a verbal contract; go to small claims court & do NOT give her any of the puppies, until resolved.

  • 1 month ago

    Show the contract to Animal Control & let them go after her. She sounds like a BYBer. Go over your contract & read all the small print. If this breeder is supposed to be a reputable breeder & you paid the amount necessary to get a high quality dog. You should not have this issue. Spread the word to all her clients or post something on her facebook page or her site online. Let everyone you know that doing business with her is not to anyone's advantage.

    You can also take her to small claims court. Don't let her get away with this. You hold all the pups until you are paid. & you know they cannot be released to anyone until they are a FULL 8 WEEKs OLD. Most BYBer ignore that law & release them as young as 4 weeks old. That is against the law.

    You got grounds somewhere, talk to Animal Control about the breeding laws or regulations.

    • Nekkid Truth!
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Animal control wont do anything since its not illegal to be a byb

  • 1 month ago

    You can take her to small claims for the amount.

    I would NEVER get into such an agreement with a *****. 3 breedings is about the most one can get out of a female if she is bred responsibly.. Which means you will never get a litter out ofnher for yourself. You may as well have got a pet female on a spay contract.

    • Nekkid Truth!
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      3 would be the most IF she produced exceptional pups, she whelped easily, and recovered well after each litter.

  • 1 month ago

    i would just talk to your breeder about it

    • Lisa1 month agoReport

      As I said I've talk to her about it and she just keeps coming up with excuses.... I need to know if there is something legally that can be done for me to break the contract.

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