sam asked in PetsDogs · 1 month ago

Dog seems to be losing house training ?

My friends and I moved into an apartment a few months ago, and we brought his 2.5 year old toy poodle shitzu mix with us. He has been somewhat of a pain since moving in, and I attributed it to a change in environment (big house to apartment) however lately he has been terrible enough for me to make a yahoo account just to ask this question.

To preface, we have him on a going outside schedule that is mostly regular, and he definitely goes out enough. He gets walked once or twice a day, we have him drinking no water after 9pm because otherwise he pees MANY times during the night.

We used to have him in the hall between our rooms on his bed with a puppy pad whenever we were gone and at night. We no longer give him the puppy pad when we are gone during the day and this has proven to be okay, no accidents with his bathroom schedule. However, he began jumping the gate and he barks a lot at random noise so we decided to crate him while we are gone during the day. He has gotten used to the crate, but is still learning to see it as his safe zone but he doesn't often have accidents in the crate maybe he has peed in there once or twice?

Update:

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  • 1 month ago

    Sometimes when you move a dog from one house to another they can be on guard with every little noise. With such a big environment change the dog can also start toileting inside. Make sure you take the dog out more frequently than you normally would and spend sometime with the dog. The move is stressful to the dog just like it can be stressful to you.

  • 1 month ago

    Your dog sounds very unhappy and lonely and is desperate for attention. Going outside to pee is one way he gets attention. Honestly, it may be time to admit at this time you and your roommate are too busy to care for a dog.

    • sam1 month agoReport

      my dog does receive plenty of attention, there are 3 of us he is always getting pet,played with, walked, snuggled. lack of attention is not the issue. he has separation anxiety

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    He needs to go to the vet. It could be a urinary tract infection instead of just behavioral.

  • 1 month ago

    The training just needs to be reinforced. Moving can cause a lot of stress for a dog and can reverse a lot of training. Maybe there is something new environment that is making your dog nervous? Pay attention to the body language your dog is portraying. Maybe set up cameras inside your house so you can see what might causing him or her to pee. It can just be that moving has made your dog a little more anxious than ussual if that's the case then just be persistent with training for the next few weeks, but if you think its something environmental possibly causing him to pee then just pay attention. Dogs are very clear at communicating to us what they need, people although aren't always opening to listening to them. That may sound silly but give yourself a chance to try and understand what your dog is telling you. A very important thing to do is not to yell, yelling will make the dog uneasy and start to associate you as a scary figure when you want him to associate you with a gentle figure that he respects bc he wants to not bc he respect out of fear. Be patient, everything will work out in time. Something you can do to help him feel safer in the cage is give him a hardy toy that you can fill with treats, he will start to associate the crate as a place where he gets a special treat. 

    - best of luck

    • sam1 month agoReport

      thank you :) a treat filled toy is a good idea, we have been giving him treats to get into the crate but that could be more effective

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You will need to use a shock collar. 

  • 1 month ago

    Yep, a move can cause all kinds of problems in dogs. Start training as if you had not done any potty training before. It just needs to be reinforced. & the pee pad is OUT OF THE QUESTION. Get rid of it.

    By using pee pads it is just teaching the dog it can go potty in the house & soon it will be anywhere in the house he choses. Reinforce him going outside to potty.

    I hate crate training. I think a crate is a great bed & a sanctuary but I would remove the door.

    • *****
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      PLEASE take this dog to a vet and have him checked over, including a urinalysis. UTIs are uncomfortable at best, and that truly is by far the most likely explanation for this behavior. If that's what is going on and it isn't treated, infection can travel to the kidneys, among other complications.

  • 1 month ago

    Look Sam, pay attention to what you are being TOLD, and stop the "yes...but" business. Many of us have owned, trained & RESCUED dogs for 35-50 years. there isn't much (if anything) we have not seen.

    The basic issue is, you want a "quick, no cost fix" but are SCOFFING at the most reasonable solution: making sure that the dog DOES NOT HAVE a medical issue like: a UTI and/or crystals in the urine, OR possible kidney or bladder stones.

    Accept for now, this may (or may NOT) have anything to do with moving. Yes, dogs can have issues with a new home esp if they have separation anxiety, but SA (in and of itself) does not change the pee pattern. Yes, toy breeds can be more prone to MARK, if suffering regular fear/anxiety - and marking (not urinating) - is done as a way to indicate "ownership" of an area, etc. Again, your vet needs to sort that out. If the dog is NOT NEUTERED, it needs to be, to get rid (or or lessen) any urge to MARK TERRITORY.

    Using pee pads is/was the worst idea IN THE WORLD! They are a SCAM PRODUCT. What their use does - is CONFUSE the dog. Just REMOVING the pads DOES NOT "FIX" the bad habit, of being allowed to pee inside the home, dummy!

    Now (with them) you have OKAYED it GOING IN YOUR HOME and allowed that to become a habit. So now it does, just not as you would like. Dogs don't just UNDO a habit (YOU APPROVED) just like dogs will NOT ALWAYS use the pad. A floor (with or without a pad) is still a floor - to the dog. It was allowed to GO on the floor, so it continues to, esp if you WON"T GET UP and let it OUT! Tough tiddly-winks, you have to get up @ 5 AM for said dog. So... go see the vet!

    However, you also indicate - the dog BEGGING to go out (scratching at your door - and then leaving a puddle) since you'd rather FUSS at it (than comply) to let it out. You see an INCREASED frequency in urinating, small amounts of pee and the dog NOT BEING ABLE to hold urine overnight - (which is NOT NORMAL!!!!) Plus it has peed in its crate, NONE OF WHICH.... a normal, healthy dog does, unless there is a problem, and WE THINK IT IS MEDICAL! (I will bet MONEY it is a medical issue, btw.)

    So "belly up to the bar", and go see the vet!

    • sam1 month agoReport

      which is part of what I am trying to solve ! so please, think about what you say before you say it and think its helpful when in reality it is just a reiteration of what others have said but in a less kind way

  • *****
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Everything you say points to a medical problem, not a behavioral one. Increased frequency of urination, and urinating on occasion in the crate, when you claim he is not crated for inappropriate lengths of time, and ASKING to go out frequently and then urinating only a small amount all warrant a thorough vet check. A healthy dog wouldn't be urinating in a crate unless they had no other option, and if this was behavioral, he wouldn't be doing everything he can to avoid having an accident. He wouldn't ask to go out, he'd just pee in the house. A UTI or diabetes would explain these things, among other conditions. When a formerly house-trained dog begins to have accidents, it should not be treated as a behavioral issue until a vet has ruled out physical problems.

  • PR
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You should take your dog to the vet. This sounds like a possible bladder infection, and the statement: "he pees MANY times during the night" would attest to that because a dog SHOULD NOT need to urinate after it beds down for the night. Something is not right - bladder infections cause an animal or a human, for that matter, to feel the need to urinate more than normal, and often unexpectedly, and to "lose" apparent prior training.

    The fact that he doesn't go in the cage will not mean he doesn't have an infection. It is simply a lot easier to hold it when sitting or laying down and confined. BUT, he won't get better and could get quite sick, if this is what is going on. 

    GET HIM TO THE VET. Right away.

    https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/guide/lower-urinary-tr...

    https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/urinary-tra...

    Just because your dog does not have ALL the symptoms in these links does not mean he DOES NOT have a bladder infection. Simply urinating often, or urgently, are likely signs.

    • sam1 month agoReport

      Amos -- Also, this is not a brand new behavior for him. when we moved we thought we had eventually trained him out of it and now he is going back. Maybe it is a health problem but if you READ i even said I was OPEN to taking him to the vet i am WORRIED about him obviously.

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Using puppy pads teaches the dog it is acceptable to toilet inside... so you have trained this........... he wakes you up and you scold him, maybe he needs to go to the toilet and you don't mention a vets visit to make sure he hasn't got any health issues.......... peeing will also get worse when there are any changes in their environment and new house, packing/unpacking, stressed owners scolding him and getting frustrated by the dog peeing in the house ( even when they have trained the dog to do that)

    • sam1 month agoReport

      i walk him daily, and play with him often. He has always had my roommate as an owner, he just is in a new environment. I am very consistent with him, and my roommates claim to be the same. I'm sure he is bored sometimes as he used to live with another dog but that is something I cannot replace.

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