Would I find a perfect job in the us?

I'm a 23 year old, japanese and American who was born and raised in Japan. I have been to USA for several times and I lived in LA for 8 months. 

Im currently studying international relationships in the university in Japan and about to graduate in 4 months. 

Here's the thing. Im thinking of moving to USA and start a new life there. Get a good job and an apartment. And here's my question. Is it possible for someone like me; born-raised in a different country, not been educated in the us to have a stable job as a full time in USA? Fyi, I speak fluent Japanese and English, great at dealing with people in a good, friendly manner. 

Please share your thoughts with me. What do you think? And also please be 100 percent honest, no hard feeling would be involved. 

6 Answers

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  • 4 weeks ago
    Best Answer

    Not much demand for those with bachelor's degrees in international relations, unless they have additional education & skills. Plenty of Americans with such degrees looking for work. Unless you have vast resources to support yourself while you look for some sort of work, do not attempt to move to another city, state, or especially country, unless you have a job already lined up.

    You might have better chances of a job in Japan. With a degree in business, such as specializing in marketing, and your international relations degree, plus experience in marketing, you might have a chance at an entry-level job in a marketing position. But from your info here, you have a really hard job trying to find any job as things stand at the moment.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Yes.

    But you are NOT a Japanese and American, as you'd have to choose one or the other before age 21. If you didn't do that, you automatically lost your Japanese citizenship and are now "only" an American living illegally in Japan.

    Looks like you have a huge surprise waiting for you.

    Source(s): An immigrant from Europe, I live on the American Riviera and work as an attorney in Santa Barbara, California.
    • ibu guru
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Also, by remaining in Japan, it appears he has chosen Japanese citizenship by default. He did not return to US before turning 21. I did not try to address this confusing issue as only an attorney in Japan can help him on this one.

  • Lisa A
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It isn't possible for most people to have a stable, full time job in the US. Good with people and friendliness are basic requirements. Not skills. What skills do you have that can get you a job?

  • 4 weeks ago

    At the age of 22 you have to choose one of the two citizenships because Japan does not allow multiple citizenship. When you enter the US on a Japanese passport there is an ESTA visa stamped into it. The Japanese will look for that stamp when you return. If you do not have it, they will know that you are also a US citizen and they will force you to chose between the two.

    So your biggest problem is that you will need to burn some serious bridges in order to even find out whether you want to live and work in the US.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Considering everything you have written I think it is very possible. A lot of people have come here and been successful with less to work with than you. The first thing that comes to mind is working as a translator at the UN but that would require you to live in New York.

    • ibu guru
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      UN uses simultaneous interpreters, which requires specialist training & certification, as do court interpreters & translators. There is no longer a great deal of demand for translators & interpreters with all the translation apps available for so many purposes.

  • 4 weeks ago

    As Long as you Speak good English Ur Good imo..

    I Would most certainly recommend that you already have a job lined up for urself.. Most likely Thiss is already a requirement unless you already have enough money ..

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