Leio asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 month ago

Can you help me with English please?

I need to save money in order to travel abroad.

I need to save money in order for me to travel abroad.

I need to save money in order that I can travel abroad.

I need to save money so that I can travel abroad.

Are these sentences grammatically correct? All is the same meaning right? If not correct, PLEASE justify.

Thank you!

2 Answers

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  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Best Answer

    Saying 'in order to/for' is very formal. People rarely say it in normal conversation.

    I'd say, "I need to save up so I can travel abroad," or, "I'll need to save up so that I can afford to travel."

  • John P
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    All of those sentences have the same meaning and are grammatically correct as far as I can judge, but the form of the third one is so unusual for me in my 70 years on Britain and Australia that I cannot be sure about its grammatical correctness.

    Only the last one is normally used by native speakers of British English. If your teacher is insisting on forms which are not normally used then you will spend a lot of time on expressions which have no use.

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