Jen asked in TravelAsia PacificKorea · 1 month ago

Banned from Korea?

Hi, I know this question might sound silly but I have a genuine concern. I currently live in Seoul with my partner who is Korean. However, our relationship is rocky and sometimes he is rather aggressive and angry. I told him I want to break up with him but he said that if I break up with him, his rich father (who is a rich man in Korea) would get me banned from the country by calling immigration. I just wonder if this is possible that he could get me banned like this. Many thanks

Update:

edit: I am here legally. and i have not broken any law. I think it was more of a 'bribe' to immigration to keep me out.

8 Answers

Relevance
  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Best Answer

    No matter which passport the person holds, all foreigners who enter Korea legally and remain here legally for any length of time require a visa to do so. You don't mention which country you're from, how long you've been in Korea, or what your specific visa status is, so it would be impossible to give you a clear, simple and accurate response, but I can say that if you are in Korea legally, no Korean national can "pull strings with immigration" to get your visa cancelled, nor could any Korean national have you permanently, or even temporarily, banned from the country without having committed any type of offense that violates Korean law or the particular constraints of your visa.

    If you hold a foreign passport and are not ethnically Korean, then you must be on a tourist visa, an employment visa or a student visa. The wide majority of visitors to Korea who hold passports that give them a visa waiver or visa on arrival are permitted to remain in the country for anywhere from 30 days to 6 months. For example, American citizens receive a 90 day visa while Canadian nationals may remain in Korea for a full six months. But people on tourist visas are not permitted to work (unless they have applied for and received the working holiday visa which does permit part-time employment), so if you've been in Korea on a tourist visa and are currently working or did work at some point, you've definitely violated the conditions of your visa and can be fined, deported and banned from re-entering for a set period of time.

    If you are currently here on a work visa, you need to leave this man's home immediately and seek new accommodation. You can file a complaint with the Korean police, but they are useless, and if he files a complaint against you out of spite, you can very easily be charged with a crime. he could say that you struck him or that you stole from him, etc., and there would be no way to prove that it isn't true. There's nothing that can be done about that. Korean nationals commit all sorts of offenses against foreigners from harassment to assault and rarely are they ever charged. In several instances, Korean men have brutally beaten or even raped foreigners and not been charged with a crime, so don't expect justice in Korea. Justice doesn't exist for foreigners, unless you're talking about making your own justice, which I cannot advocate here, and then fleeing the country. According to Korean law, crimes committed against Korean nationals, either here or abroad, are punishable offenses where the offender can be tried in absentia and sentenced, so think about that.

    If you're on a student visa, a lot of that same information applies. If you have permission to seek part-time employment, that would be all right, but if you don't have permission, and you work anyway, you're in violation and can be fined and deported.

    Look, this is probably not what you want to hear, but here it is anyway: You're going to have to leave this man and leave the country. Right away. And you're going to have to do it wisely. Purchase a flight ticket out of the country and plan to leave sometime in the next few days. Select a time when you know this man will be occupied and won't notice your absence immediately. Pack your things hurriedly, gather all of your documents, and just go. Get on a bus to the airport and don't look back. Once you're through security, nothing can be done. He could try and prevent you from leaving, but by the time the Korean cops - incompetent dolts that they are, managed to contact people in Incheon, you'd be gone. Then, cut off all contact with this man. Don't ever answer another phone call, don't ever reply to another message, text, e-mail or anything like that. Change your number, block him on all social media accounts, privatize all of your pages and screen new requests for fake accounts. Make it a fast, clean break and completely cut this man from your life, no hesitation, no explanation, no regrets. Just do it.

    Without an existing complaint, there's no history that verifies his behaviour. If something were to happen later, it'd be your word against his. He could hurt you, hospitalise you, and what recourse would you have? You could press charges, but if he's from a family that's got money, he'd never see the inside of a cell for a long time. This is a country where a man rapes and murders a child and gets 10 years with time off for good behaviour. The legal system here would be a farce if it wasn't so terrifyingly flawed. This is probably the worst first-world developed and wealthy country to have any type of legal problem in, and that's saying a lot because some countries out there are pretty scary when it comes to the law.

    Get out of Korea.

    It's only your relationship keeping you here, and your relationship is unhealthy. You are with an abuser and it will only get worse if you stay. if you wish to come back at one point, make sure you don't come back to Seoul and you might want to report your passport as lost or damaged and get a new one issued so that the number will be different. Then, even if this guy somehow manages to convince someone in immigration to flag it, it won't come up right away.

    Good luck and take this seriously. When I say get out, I mean it. Don't be stupid.

    • Andrew
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      You're very welcome. I wish you luck with everything. Be safe.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Asian men have janitor faces.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    He can't ban you right away. If you don't have your F5 yet, and you only have your F6, then your F6 can be cancelled after you guys divorce and you should leave Korea before it is cancelled. If you leave Korea on time, then you don't have to worry about it and you can re-visit Korea as a visitor/tourist as long as you didn't break any other laws. If you already have your F5 (premanent resident permit), then you don't have to worry about anything and you can just divorce him and live in Korea

  • 1 month ago

    You are the outsider.

    Can dad make things difficult for you.YES

    Can he get you deported ? Probably not.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • John
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Leave him. Today. Life is too short to waste even a minute on assholes.

  • 1 month ago

    I don't think anyone on here knows how things work in Korea. But you need to get out even if it means leaving Korea, before you end up dead.

  • 1 month ago

    Your story isn't clear.

  • 1 month ago

    Well are you there legally? Not sure how things work in Korea.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.