scratches in horses?

4 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    Scratches is caused by a variety of skin conditions including viral, bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections.

  • 1 month ago

    sometimes all the goo we smear on it just creates a damp environment for it to spread even more. I like simple treatment the best and you can also use the castille sooap a few times a week as a preventitive. warm water, sponge and a good scrubbing with castille soap. Not iory, not dove not any other soap except for castille. It has a drying action and superior rinsability. I like doing this when the horse comes into the clean stall for the night. Dry well with a towel. Go ahead and feed and finish remaining barn chores. The heel should be dry by now. You can apply a homemade cream of crushed up smz tablets, & neosporin creme. Not ointment, but use the creame. Rub the mixture well into the heal . You will also notice the grease on the back of the horses leg, under the hock and also grease on the hind leg shin bones. All this has to be washed with the castille soap at night. I also reapply the creame in the morning at turnout time. This normally takes 4 or 5 days and then the treatment should be complete. Use the castille 2 or 3 times a week during the rainy season as a preventatitve.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    This is a very common problem, especially for horses that live in damp or wet conditions.for long periods of time.Also called "greased heel", it's an infection of the upper layers of the skin caused by infestations of the chorioptic mite. The lifespan of the mite is very short-only about 3 weeks from birth to death. What they do is they get under the hair of the horse's legs near the heels or behind the fetlocks, and they burrow into the skin. They feed there on dead skin cells, and when they reach a certain point, they mature and reproduce, laying their eggs on the horse's skin too. Then they die. This burrowing action creates tiny wounds which can cause sores if they get infected with bacteria. When this happens, you end up with the condition called "scratches" or "greased heel".

    Treatment of this problem involves stopping the life cycle of the mite, and keeping the horse in a dry area so that he/she doesn't become reinfected. Severely infected sores require treatment with antibiotics.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    There a gazillions of articles about this. Type "equine scratches" or "horse dew poisoning" or "pastern dermatitis" into your favorite search engine.

    Do you have a specific question? You didn't actually ask one.

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