Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Social ScienceGender & Women's Studies · 10 months ago

Do you think stereotypes play a role in the gender pay gap? Why/ why not?

6 Answers

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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Every serious study on the gender pay gap in the 21st century has concluded that minus motherhood there really IS no gender pay gap. The problem isn't that we need to pay women more or men less. It's that we need the same kind of family leave policies every other developed nation has. The only person I know who was actually fired for leaving work to attend a parent/teacher conference was a man. So this issue really isn't just one for women to worry about. The US claims to champion "family values" yet makes it as difficult as possible for a private sector worker to actually perform the functions necessary to having a family.

    • Q
      Lv 7
      9 months agoReport

      This is inaccurate. See my answer.

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  • God
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    THERE IS NO GENDER PAY GAP. 

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  • 10 months ago

    Yes. Undoubtedly.

    To those saying there is no "gender pay gap", yes there bloody well is. Men, on average, are paid more than women, on average, to the tune of around 75 cents on the dollar. This is not an apples-to-apples comparison of men vs women working the same jobs with the same experience and so on, but that doesn't mean that none of it is due to bias.

    The apples-to-apples pay gap does appear to be real as well (to the tune of about 5%), but it's less certain. Different studies reach different figures, including no statistically significant gap.

    So on to the OP's question.

    The sterotype is that women with children always want to be the primary parent, and men with children don't really care. So there's both a lot more pressure on women to be the ones to, eg, take time off work to deal with the kids, and a lot more *permission* for women to do so (eg more maternity leave than paternity leave available). This means women with kids will work fewer hours, and thus make less money.

    Similarly, the idea that certain skill sets are "women's work", and are easy and therefore not deserving of competitive pay, leads to women with typical female employment interests (eg nursing, teaching, secretarial work) to make less than men with typical male employment interests. Personally, I would much rather literally dig ditches all day than have to answer phones all day (yay, Asperger's)

    And I might have more answers if I wasn't half braindead from lack of sleep.

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  • 10 months ago

    No. There's been multiple thorough investigations of the wage gap, which found multiple causal influences which needed to be factored out if the study was to focus on innate unfairness in the wage discrepencies.

    Once these factors had been accounted for, there was very little left of the gap (3 or 4%). What was said of this remaining gap, was that the reasons had become so multitudinous and varied that further drilldown had become unfeasible. But in all that they had managed to categorise, they had not found evidence of sexism

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    On average, women work fewer hours, have shorter careers and choose lower paying work, so on average, they earn less. I suppose you could call this average a stereotype.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    I have yet to be provided evidence that this "gender pay gap" even exists.

    • Elana
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      Oh, you've been provided plenty of evidence. You may not accept it (I know I view most of it as agenda based, biased etc), but you can't claim that people aren't digging and posting.

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