I wanted to become a PA, (physician assistant). Is it better to just take the pre reqs as an undergrad or graduate and then take it?

Hey all! So I had some mishaps in my life which caused me to do poorly in the science courses, I am a hard worker and plan to do well (I STUDY SO HARD). So Im basically done with credits and I can graduate if I wanted, no problem. But, I do need about 5 to 6 more classes (lets be mindful that BIO classes aren't easy) so Id need to take them 2 at a time, to keep up and focus. Im not sure if I should graduate and come back to take the courses (or possibly somewhere else) OR if I should stay as undergrad and take the courses and graduate when I am completed with those courses.

MEANINGFUL ADVICE HELP !!! also gotta take the GRE

4 Answers

Relevance
  • 10 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    It's definitely better -not- to graduate and to take the classes, assuming you have the time and money. You need to raise your undergraduate GPA; once you graduate, it's set in stone, regardless of any additional classes you take afterwards, either at the graduate or undergraduate level.

    Retake the classes you did poorly in (even if your university does not have grade forgiveness, it will show that you can do the work) and take the prerequisite classes you need. Needless to say, you need to get As in everything.

    The GRE should be fairly easy. Take a prep class if you need a math review, but it's not that different from the SAT.

    • Amanda10 months agoReport

      Thank you so much...just so hard to deal with rn!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 10 months ago

    There is NO rule that says you CANNOT take more credit hours if courses than the minimum number of credit hours required to earn a bachelors degree. If you can take the required prereq courses as dual credit or graduate credit courses as an undergraduate, take them as graduate credit level courses.

    Depending on the policies of the university, graduate school and the department or school granting the masters degree some of those graduate level courses MIGHT count as credit v hours toward a masters degree.

    Be aware that some point the college is going to INSIST you graduate. Colleges and universities no longer want perpetual students taking the seats of mature students returning to school for any reason. You HAVE to admitted to a degree or professional program of some type. Yiu can take only a limited number of courses as a non-degree seeking continuing education student.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Stoo
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    You definitely have to focus on what needs to be done, and if that includes bio courses that's what you have to focus on.

    You also have to ask yourself if this is your path. I too didn't like bio courses. Last time I took it was Grade 11. Every time I go to my physical therapist I'm confused, but do my best to learn what connects to what. But I never once figured that was my career so that's OK.

    I took a vocational test in high school and my worst career match was biomedical illustrator. I can't draw and can't give a **** about biology, so pretty much spot on. But I also never once had a dream about being one.

    Why are you interested in being a PA? If it's only for money, you can make money so many other ways. Pick something that's actually compatible with your interests and talents. I already make more money than most biomedical illustrators. Don't commit to a path of study you'd hate and probably suck at.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    i would ask the people at your school this question

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.