what is the best virus protector for an iMac?

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  • Rayal
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    I don't run any. But I don't visit sketchy porn sites of click links in spam emails.

    I have never had a virus or any of that kind of stuff.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    Not necessary it will only make your computer run really slow. But you could look into internet security. Such as anti spyware or adware protection. But there won't be any viruses on a mac since hackers don't really know how to hack the special type of install package (.dmg)

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  • 10 months ago

    Some Mac users say they have never had any virus. Some PC users say adware and ransomware pop-ups are viruses and Macs do get those.

    TWO "DEFINITIONS" ARE THE BASIS OF CONTROVERSY:

    (1) computer virus = app that attaches to a system file and can alter the operating system or damage it.

    (2) computer virus = anything you don't like. (For me, Chinese bitter melon is a virus, because I hate it.)

    Using the accurate definition (1), there are no known viruses that can damage Mac OS X. There are still some malware issues, not damaging, but annoying, and the worst of them can read data from your drive and send that info to a remote computer for identity theft. That is a serious issue, even if it isn't technically a virus. See the first link below.

    I researched the various “Best Mac Antivirus 2018” articles. MacWorld U.K. ranks them like this: (1) Intego, not free (2) Norton Security for Mac, not free (3) Sophos, free (4) Avira, free (5) Antivirus Zap, not free. PC Magazine ranks them like this: (1) Kapersky Internet Security, not free (Tied for first) Bitdefender for Mac, free or pay (3) Norton Security for Mac, not free (Tied for 4,5,6) Webroot Secure Anywhere, Trend Micro, ESET Cyber Security, Sophos.

    To explain why Mac OS X (and Linux) do not get damaging viruses is quite simple: Mac OS X and Linux do not allow software to install itself. An admin user's password must be typed to install files into the protected areas of the OS, and so far, viruses cannot type your password. THIS SIMPLE PROTECTION IS MISSING FROM WINDOWS. It is possible for you to type your admin password to install a Trojan horse app (means it is disguised as something good, but it ain't), but each time the evil app tries to change any Mac OS X installed file, you would get additional password requests, such as "The app 'TrustMe' needs to make changes to your system" along with a prompt to type your password. Just don't, and then research how to remove 'TrustMe'.

    I use Avira, because it is not huge, scans on a schedule, updates on a schedule (as often as daily), doesn’t annoy me with false positives, and doesn’t slow my computer while it scans. At the last link below is an article that tests the speed of a spreadsheet task in Open Office while each A-V scan is running. A full-disk scan is not something you would run daily, more like monthly or quarterly. The normal or quick scan covers your user directory and the installed OS X directories, so that's the daily scan for 95% of us. The differences in effect during quick scan are negligible, so small as to be meaningless. You really are seeing a virtual 6-way tie for "Best" if you think this "test" is the proper criteria. You really need to consider the ease of use or drive space required. The use of anti-virus in OS X will likely do as much good as an alligator trap in Denver. When and if an alligator shows up in downtown Denver, we'll be prepared.

    I don’t like Sophos, because it is the slowest, and often finds false positives. Sophos itself is also open to invasion–> http://www.pcworld.com/article/2013580/researcher-...

    Avast “FREE” version is not really free. It is a trial version that starts to nag about “Your trial will end. Please buy...” and then finally just stops working. I have confirmed this on two Macs, so it is not just a fluke. Yes, it does have a hidden option to let you ask for a registration code for the trial version, and thus change it from a trial to really free, but that is such a marketing cheat intended to keep people from knowing they can get it free, that I won't even consider such a scam. Avast also installs "SafePrice" adware, http://www.computerhope.com/forum/index.php?topic=... just the type of thing you would want to use Avast to REMOVE, but it doesn't ever remove its own adware.

    Bitdefender fails to even scan the first time on all my Macs.

    In 18 years using about 20 Macs, I have used almost every type of anti-virus, some paid, others free. The total infections detected up to now is zero. Your mileage may vary, ESPECIALLY if you like to click on pop-up advertisements. In fact, the type of "infection" most Mac owners complain about nowadays is ADWARE – pop-up ads that are annoying and interfere with your activities, even if they are totally unable to damage Mac OS X installed files. Most adware are installed as a "piggy-back" installation when you get some junk from a sketchy grab-bag site like Softonic, Soft32, Softpedia, or CNET. Another common source of adware is sites that offer "FREE MOVIES" or "FREE TV SHOWS", but they require that you install their "Video Enabler" or whatever. You are the one who typed your password to install the junk, not knowing it was hidden as a secondary installer inside the download package. Anti-virus apps CANNOT DETECT MOST ADWARE, because adware is not really dangerous. It is annoying as hell, so you have to use steps found here–> https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20141... to get rid of it.

    See the links below for whichever you prefer.

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    Source(s): http://www.roughlydrafted.com/2009/01/29/the-mac-m... Anti-virus apps.... http://www.avira.com/en/avira-free-mac-security (Avira, free, for Mac OS X 10.8 or higher – scans for Windows malware, too) http://www.avg.com/us-en/avg-antivirus-for-mac (AVG, free, for OS 10.8 or higher – scans for Windows, Android malware, too) https://www.malwarebytes.org/antimalware/mac/ http://tinyurl.com/7rtz2dk (Comodo, free – used Tiny URL, since their real URL is 777 characters!!!!) http://www.tomsguide.
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  • 10 months ago

    Common sense.

    Little need for anti-virus software on any Unix-like OS.

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  • Robin
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    use a condom ........................

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  • 10 months ago

    I don't know. I use Avast mostly. Pretty reliable and seems to keep it pretty clean.

    Update: I guess I should add that I don't normally keep it running I'm the background as I would with a PC. I just do a scan periodically. That seems to be enough.

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