Renaldo asked in PetsCats · 10 months ago

What determines if a cat should be quarantined in home or under a veterinarian's care? Can I contest this decision?

My cat escaped for the first time Sept13. I posted she had escaped on a community bulletin board. A women grabbed the cat, pulled her tail and was scratched and bitten. Her rabies shot was May 8 or four months over due. Even though she never bit or scratched anyone this woman claims animal control wants me to quarantine her for ten days in a shelter or vet's. I don't mind keeping her indoors . I certainly want to get her rabies shot. I never intend for her to go outdoors again.

8 Answers

Relevance
  • *****
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    That's determined by the law that applies where you live. Feel fortunate. In my State, if a pet is not current on its rabies vaccine and they bite someone, breaking skin, they are seized and euthanized for testing. Quarantine is not an option.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    Do what they ask you to do if you want to have your cat again.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Eva
    Lv 5
    10 months ago

    That is the law for unvaccinated animals. You can agree to cage her at home. And that means caged, not running loose where she could possibly escape again.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 10 months ago

    The cat has no vaccine and AC needs to quarantine it. You can't do a home quarantine since it has no vaccine and you allowed the cat to run loose. AC can't trust you to not allow the cat to roam while under quarantine.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • PR
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    Normally rabies vaccinations last longer than they state. Find out who specifically told her this and talk to them or get a written order. If there is no written order then keep the cat indoors at your own home. Double check with your veterinarian in case the rabies vaccine will cover her for a longer period of time than you are thinking.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 10 months ago

    Not your decision. You didn't bother to keep your cat up to date on shots, it bit someone so it NEEDS to be held to make sure it doesn't have rabies.

    But animal control should be the one telling you this NOT this woman. What happens is THEIR decision not this woman's.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 10 months ago

    This may vary by region, but when I worked in an animal hospital that quarantined animals for rabies observation, two veterinary exams were required daily. It's not something that could be done at the owner's home.

    Sometimes, quarantining at the animal control facility was less expensive, but the quarantined pet was stressed more and exposed to more potential illness. The "potential illness" part was especially relevant for young and otherwise vulnerable animals.

    You'll need to check regulations in your location.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 10 months ago

    First it is determined by the law and second by police and their assessment of your abilities to control the animal.

    "A women grabbed the cat, pulled her tail and was scratched and bitten."

    "Even though she never bit or scratched anyone"

    So a women was bitten, how can you claim that the cat has never bitten anyone? If you mean before this incident then you should state that. But, in the eyes of the law it doesn't really matter. If the woman was bitten a quarantine would usually be required. The location of the quarantine could be up for debate/interpretation by the police (or responsible agency in your jurisdiction)

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.