AskZilla asked in Cars & TransportationAircraft · 10 months ago

Why do airplane pilots sometimes reject take-off once they've started?

That would scare the bejeezus out of me

8 Answers

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  • 10 months ago
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    Presuming it's not because of a technical issue it's often because of a runway incursion, i.e. a vehicle, aircraft or animal entering the runway. Here it's usually foxes, we just can't keep 'em away, so you either stop if you can and wait for the fireman to shoo them off or carry on and hope . . .

    If it's a larger aircraft using V speeds the crew always discuss what is to happen if an issue comes up during takeoff. Below V1 they can stop, above V1 they cannot safely stop.

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  • 10 months ago

    Because Jim Carey highjacked a flight of stairs

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  • 10 months ago

    Because if they didnt everyone might die.

    Source(s): Glider pilot.
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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    I've been on a commercial flight that aborted due to an engine failure.

    And I've been PIC in a light plane where I aborted due to sudden loss of oil pressure. Oil cooler coupling fractured.

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  • 10 months ago

    Mostly because of a fault with the aircraft or the runway is not clear.

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  • 10 months ago

    Power failure, communications problem, runway incursion, hijacker in cockpit (saw that in a Clint Eastwood movie!). Since the pilot is responsible for what the plane does, then if in his judgement any damn thing means he should not take to the air, he should not.

    Source(s): 41 years ago this month, a full 737 hit a block from my house. With at least 3 qualified pilots in cockpit, it still hit a Cessna. So you just never know.
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  • 10 months ago

    If an unusual event such as a warning or alert occurs before V1 or failure to reach V1 prior to a certain distance on the Runway, a reject takeoff will occur. I don’t agree with Dennis. It is safer to deal with a problem on the ground rather than 10,000 feet in the air going 200 knots and following a departure or return procedure. V1 is a calculated speed that the airplane can’t stop before running out of runway. If involved in a rejected takeoff, rest assured that it the proper action and safer than the alternative

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  • 10 months ago

    It would have to be something major, such as an engine loss, thrust reverser unlocked, unsafe landing gear or blown tire before "Refusal Speed"

    Minor problems can be dealt with later in the air, and if necessary make a return to the field. Once airborne they can take time to evaluate the problem.

    Most pilots and crew talk about what is grounds for a rejected take off. Any other Caution lights or minor problems can be dealt with once airborne.

    Source(s): Retired AF SNCO, Instructor Flight Engineer.
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