How did the Captain of the Carpathia know where to go to rescue the survivors of the Titanic if there wasn't any radar or sonar or GPS?

Technology in 1912 (107 years ago) to say where the Titanic was or how far away the titanic was from the Carpathia

Update:

@ david how did the Captain of the Carpathia identify their location by radio

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  • 10 months ago
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    The Titanic knew where it was (more or less) and told everyone where they believed they actually were. It was normal for ships to navigate by regular readings of location (determine location at a specific time) and then extrapolate the course based on heading and speed and time since last reading of location. Rescue ships headed toward that presumed location and then started to look around the area until they found the ship or survivors. Lights and flares were employed to help the searchers once they were close enough to visually observe such signals. Sometimes it worked very well and other times, not well at all (the calculated locations were way off the true location).

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  • 10 months ago

    The Titanic told them where they were, using normal nautical coordinates.

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  • 10 months ago

    The captain of the Titanic included his calculation of the ship's position in the radio distress call. Based on old fashioned navigational skills using a sextant and chronometer. Good enough to get the Carpathia in the right area to search.

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  • 10 months ago

    The Carpathia and the Titanic captains knew their positions quite well enough ... within a few miles. With radio Morse code, it's a simple matter to broadcast your location. This link gives the messages.

    As for how they knew their positions: sextant several times a day, plus dead-reckoning by known bearing and speed. The ship navigator and his helpers could give the location every minute, accurate to a few nautical miles. The ship cruised at about 0.38 miles per minute, and I bet they knew the speed within 5% or better. If the last sextant reading was at twilight, then the position error would have been about 8 nautical miles. (Maybe up to 15 miles error, if the navigator was really far off in estimating the ocean currents.)

    The crew of the Titanic sent off flares, which could be seen for 30 miles or more. But they were white, not the distress red.

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  • 10 months ago

    They used Morse code . A device was a telegraph . It was sent out using radio signal.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    Friend back in those days they used an instrument called a sextant here is an actual replica of the one that was used on Titanic 2 plot course and position. You pointed it either the Sun the moon or the stars and you can send a position that is very accurate

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  • 10 months ago

    He heard the radio message. In the old days ships charted their course and daily confirmed location by sextant when the weather permitted. At sea then with radio's in use bearings would be taken with a directional antenna. The position of the ship was plotted by triangulation. Of course there was an error factor. If the ship was just over the horizon flares shot into the sky would be visible.

    It has been decades sense I read the documentaries on the Titanic, but I am sure the charted location was broadcast by radio (Morris code) as part of the SOS signal.

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  • 10 months ago

    Ship navigators were able to estimate their position by tracking their route using compass headings and speeds, starting from a previous known position. When the Sun or stars were visible, they were able to determine their actual longitude and latitude. The ship's chronometer had been invented, which gave them accurate time to use in their navigation calculations. So, after Titanic hit the iceberg, they transmitted their position, as best they knew it.

    As rescue ships approached, they searched the general area. The searchers were aware the location sent might have some amount of inaccuracy. They also were aware survivors may have drifted from the location sent with the distress message.

    They also sent up flares, a visual signal, to help ships find them.

    • Morningfox
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      >> The ship's chronometer had been invented,
      By 1912, there were regular time broadcasts by radio stations on land.

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  • David
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    Have you heard of radio?

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