Why does the recipe in the book to make yogurt say to put the milk in a jar with some yogurt for 24 hours?

Why does it have to be 24 hours because it takes way less than that. What happens is the yogurt seperates from yougurt. Do I have to do what it says?

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  • 10 months ago

    You need live yogurt cultures to grow in the milk you are mixing in. Without the starter culture, you will only get milk, or sour milk. The length of time depends on temperature and the amount of starter. And everything has to be clean and bacteria free, or you'll make weird tasting yogurt.

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  • 10 months ago

    You have to make sure the yogurt you are adding contains live cultures if it does not contain live cultures you will not end up with yogurt.

    Follow the instructions be careful about the temperature and you will have yogurt

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  • 10 months ago

    You're adding the culture in the yogurt to the milk to create a reaction between the warm milk and thoroughly incorporated yogurt, and by allowing it to sit for 24 hrs in a warm controlled environment insures the process - no different than baking a cake for a specific time and temp to ensure doneness. 24 hrs is the standard time, based on most methods.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    If you want it to do what it's supposed to do it takes 24 hours for the souring process to do what it's supposed to do if you don't let it set long enough it's not going to taste like yogurt.

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  • 10 months ago

    Compare other yogurt recipes, and if they tend to all say the same thing, then do that. If not, do what most of them say

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  • 10 months ago

    I've never left mine for longer than overnight, say 12 hours max. Yoghurt devlops in flavour, so maybe that could be the reason or maybe it's a cold climate instruction because yoghurt needs at least ambient warmth. So, no, whenever it's thickened and tastes like yoghurt, is fine

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  • Bill
    Lv 6
    10 months ago

    yes -- or you just go make yogurt your own way and see just how well that will turn out

    the milk requires the yogurt culture to start the process in making yogurt from the milk and it all becomes the same yogurt

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