Johnny asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 11 months ago

was pstd know in the medieval era especially during the hundred year war?

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  • 11 months ago
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    Well, the term was coined in the late 1970s, so it obviously wasn't called that.

    But some psychiatrists familiar with the disorder claim to find references to its symptoms in Shakespeare - "Henry IV" in particular.

    One of the problems with trying to find these kinds of parallels in history is that Psychiatry didn't exist yet, so no one would have pieced it all together yet. And wouldn't for several centuries.

    But remember, there's a reason that Phobos and Deimos accompanied their father Ares into battle in Greek mythology. Even then, there was a specific kind of fear and terror associated with war, different from any other type.

  • 11 months ago

    It was referred to as shell shock.

  • John P
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Growing up in Britain in the 1950s, I can say for sure that PTSD was unheard of by me. Probably I did not hear of PTSD as a "new" problem until the 1980s, possibly the 1990s.

    Almost all mental issues of any sort were not categorised much before the start of the 20th century.

  • Athena
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Not as PTSD.

    It was refereed to as shell shock.

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  • 11 months ago

    No, it wasn't finally understood until after the Vietnam War.

  • 11 months ago

    never heard of in that time, if a person displayed the symptoms, they were seen as weak and killed off.

  • Anonymous
    11 months ago

    Not by that name...............

  • Sandy
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    I'm sure it was, but too back then, men knew they were going to have to fight and die for someone at some point. most who fought did not survive to HAVE PTSD. when you go medieval fighting, you usually die horribly.

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