1. Identify the relevant professional values and ethics, your own relevant values, and any societal?

At one time, the biological and adoptive parents of adoptees were assured that private information would remain confidential and would never be shared with the adoptee. Presently, the right of adopted persons to information about their biological parents is becoming recognized in more and more jurisdictions. At one... show more At one time, the biological and adoptive parents of adoptees were assured that private information would remain confidential and would never be shared with the adoptee. Presently, the right of adopted persons to information about their biological parents is becoming recognized in more and more jurisdictions. At one time, the biological and adoptive parents were assured that such information would remain confidential and would never be shared with the adoptee. Since court decision and legislative enactments in some states now guarantee the right of adopted persons to this information, social workers in these jurisdictions may have little choice but to reveal this information, even though they had earlier, in good faith, assured both biological and adoptive parents that this information would remain confidential. Is it ethical for social workers in states that have not yet passed legislation to continue to tell biological and adoptive parents that this information will always remain confidential?
Update: 5. Which alternative actions will be most efficient, effective, and ethical, as well as result in your
doing the least harm possible?
6. Have you considered and weighed both short- and long-term ethical consequences?
7. Final check: Is the planned action impartial, generalizable, and justifiable?
5 answers 5