Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 10 months ago

What is the easiest second language to learn for English speakers?

12 Answers

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  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    10 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Disregarding toys like "toki pona" and conlangs with less than a million users, Esperanto

    Closest related to English are Scots, Frisian and Afrikaans, but according to the US Foreign Service Institute.. learning Frisian or Afrikaans takes just as much time as learning Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, French, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Italian or Romanian

    Source(s): Dutch, speaking German, English, French and Esperanto
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  • 10 months ago

    I was taught much of Latin in third grade. I took Spanish for 3 years and still struggle with it, however i remember how to from sentences with Latin.

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  • Robin
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    they could learn canadian engish, australian english, indian english, singapore english and I hate to say it but if their grammar is really bad then american english

    • Don Verto
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      Nonsense.English is the same language in print and as taught in schools every where.
      The differences are very minor.Accents differ and every where you will find bad speakers.
      Dialects differ but they are not taught in schools.

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  • 10 months ago

    All the Germanic languages, I'd say

    • Pontus
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      Not entirely, even though English is Germanic. Per the American Foreign Service Institute, Icelandic & Faroese are in level IV for difficulty (V is the hardest). German is level II. The others though are level I - the easiest on the list. But some constructed languages are easier.

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  • 10 months ago

    It is sort of a toss up between French and Dutch.

    French and English share a lot of vocabulary.

    Dutch and English also share a lot of vocabulary.

    Dutch might be easier except for gutteral sounds like sch,ch and G

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    • Julien
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      It's not like Spanish-French, where the similarity is such that for most words you can just start from the word in one language, apply some basic mechanical changes (such as getting rid of the -o and -a), and that's enough to guess the word that you didn't know in the other language.

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    It depends on the individual person. At school I found French easier than German (but I started French 4 years earlier than German, at the age of 8). My wife, in a different school system, found German easier than French. We concluded that the quality of the teachers made much of the difference.

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  • al
    Lv 5
    10 months ago

    Pig Latin is the easiest.

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  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    I found Spanish very easy, and French only marginally harder.

    Italian isn't very difficult either.

    I struggle with German, Welsh and Latin.

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    • Question10 months agoReport

      voto " latino"? A propósito , el ex presidente George W Bush es un buen hombre pero su español es demasiado pobre ..¿ y por qué los cantantes mediocres de Estados Unidos o Canadá no aprenden el fácil idioma español para así poder conquistar el enorme mercado hispano parlante ?

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  • Julien
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    I would say Scots first, then Esperanto. The third one could be Frisian.

    If you want a language with a state, I'ld say probably Dutch. It's both very close to English and looking much lighter grammatically than German (I say that without speaking Dutch).

    If you only want the language of a (former) great power or influential country, I guess Spanish would be in good position. Especially in a scholar context in which writing and orthography would be an important component.

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    • finc10 months agoReport

      If native Spanish speakers find spanish orthography to be difficult and complex then how on earth can non native Spanish speakers find spanish orthography "easy"?

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  • 10 months ago

    Spanish, or Latin if you have money.

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