Does the U.S. consider it 'bad' to move out of the country permanently? Would I be a traitor?

I would like to move to another country, wed my fiance there and then spend the rest of my life in her country.

Is it proper to become a citizen of another country and give up citizenship of the U.S.?

Update:

I'm wondering what the official U.S. Government's view on my plan.

I have always been a good citizen, paid my taxes and served in the military. I would like to be on good terms with the U.S. and may wish to come back for short visits.

14 Answers

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  • 10 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    1. The U.S. does not consider it 'bad'.

    2. You would not be a traitor.

    3. Is it proper.

    4. When you give up citizenship of the U.S., you must pay the tax on some things that are part of your net worth and have not yet been taxed, but would not be taxed until later if you remained a citizen. For example, you must pay capital gains tax on things that you still own (capital gains are normally not taxed until you sell or dispose of the asset) and on assets in your IRA (which are normally not taxed until they are taken out of the IRA).

    5. Whether you can easily come back for short visits depends on where you become a citizen. Anyone entering the U.S. from another country must have a passport from the country where they are a citizen. Citizens of most third world, Muslim, communist, etc., countries, and some other countries, must also have a visa from the U.S. government, even for short visits. Citizens of Canada, most western European countries, and a few other countries in different parts of the world, can visit for short times with only their passport and do not need a visa for short visits. (However, they do need a visa to work in the U.S., live in the U.S., or visit for longer times.)

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    Man give me your citzenship, I'd happily even pay you. Stuck in middle East country that's economy draining and dangerous to live in when all I want is a safe life and good job oh god why I did to deserve that life lol

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  • 10 months ago

    You have to make your choice in the matter.

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  • 10 months ago

    Nope, you are welcome to do that.

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  • 10 months ago

    The "United States" gives a hoot where you live. Some US citizens have never even visited the United States once in their lifetime. They were born abroad and will die abroad.

    Even if you live "forever" in a foreign country, you will not cut off your penis and you will not renounce your US citizenship, the latter being worth $1M, give or take, unless you make millions of dollars per year like, say, Tina Turner, and it just makes sense from a tax perspective. Once you make about $500,000 per year, consult a tax attorney to consider this.

    Source(s): An immigrant from Europe, I live on the American Riviera and work as an attorney in Santa Barbara, California.
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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    You can do as you like. Just know that until you actually renounce your US citizenship you still have to file a US tax return every year.

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  • 10 months ago

    It's not a matter of "proper" or "improper" but your personal choice. If you want to immigrate elsewhere, meet all requirements of some other country, and eventually obtain citizenship there, you can - if you wish - renounce US citizenship.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    Yes. The US charges you a tax to expatriate. A TAX to leave the country.

    And, if you leave the US because you're tired of high taxes, Democraps will spew vitriol at you for it.

    😂 😘 👌 Lolz

    • ...Show all comments
    • RICK
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      Considering the US taxes the wealthy less then aslmost every other country in the world that's a stupid reason to leave
      And that was true even before Trumps tax cuts

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    "Proper"? It's not a matter of "propriety". Plenty of people have left their countries to come to the US for various reasons, so why wouldn't it be all right to do the reverse and move to another nation? Certainly Americans have done that, and they are not "traitors".

    What matters is the reason. In your case, you have a fiancée, and presumably you see important advantages to moving to her country rather than having her move here. That's fine. Go right ahead. Most Americans don't care what you choose to do; your choices are irrelevant to them. So, make whatever decision about this seems best and wisest to you.

    • Donut Tim
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      Thanks for the advice.
      What I would like to know is the U.S. government's legal view of it.

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  • L
    Lv 4
    10 months ago

    Who is 'The US'? There's over 327 million people in the country.

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