If an employee’s job description includes going on errands/post office, & he has OCD, does he have the right to refuse when asked?

Let’s say his illness triggers the need to stay in the office. So if a messenger run is requested, he’ll say he’s busy, when all he’s doing is “straightening” things, which means nothing important needs to be done at the moment and that he’s available. Would the HR manager waive that (his attitude) on his yearly evaluation, since he has a mental condition and can’t help it? Or is the fact that he has two legs and is not PHYSICALLY handicapped, make his OCD irrelevant?

8 Answers

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  • GEEGEE
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No. It's in the job description, so that's something the person should have discussed then, before accepting the position,

  • ****
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Did he disclose his OCD at the job interview

  • Judy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No, if you can't or won't do the basic job duties, you aren't required to be given accommodations. You can be terminated and replaced.

  • 2 months ago

    Employers have every right to fire employees who cannot or will not perform the required work. Even in the case of actual handicap or disability, employers are not required to pay people who cannot accomplish the required work.

    Federal law generally requires large companies to make reasonable accommodations for disabled employees, but they still aren't required to pay someone who can't actually make a meaningful contribution to the work load.

    Also, OCD generally is not a recognized handicap. People throw that term around a lot but most people who claim to have "OCD" have not actually been diagnosed with a disability by a licensed medical professional or licensed mental health professional.

    • Big Mouth
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      Funny thing is most people who claim to have OCD haven't been diagnosed but the people who have been diagnosed don't see it as a disability and would never admit it...

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    If he has been diagnosed with a disability, he may be granted "reasonable accommodation" by his employer.

    YOU are not privy to information about this person's disability or the details of any reasonable accommodation discussions or his employer's evaluation of his work performance.

    Stop worrying about this guy. It's your job to run errands and you have not been diagnosed with a disability. Do your job or be replaced. None of us here have to work with you but we're already tired of YOUR whining and attitude.

  • Sam
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Yes, you dont have to do anything. They also dont need to keep you as an employee.

  • Alex
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    You have the right to refuse to do anything. They also have the right to fire you. So it's a trade off. That being said, if you don't like/want/can't do the duties of a particular job and you know this, then you'll be well served by finding a new job that is more suited to your abilities. Just always find a new job before quitting an old one, as any job is better than no job.

  • 2 months ago

    i think he should do his job or he shouldnt be there

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