promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted

How relevant are degrees in History, Philosophy etc in today's world of STEM?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • 7 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is common to hear today, in the era of big data and STEM — science, technology, engineering, and mathematics — that liberal arts degrees are, well, relatively worthless. What is someone with a degree in English literature going to do with it, besides teach?

    Since then, private and public pushes to increase STEM education have given rise to new concerns about the value of a liberal arts education — as well as arguments about why it is incredibly valuable, even to people going into STEM fields

    Yet fewer students are studying the liberal arts than they did a few decades ago. A recent study by the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, through its Humanities Indicators project, found that the number of bachelor’s degrees in the humanities that were earned in 2015, the last year for which there is data, was down nearly 10 percent from three years earlier.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 7 months ago

    One of my most amazing courses was a history of physics class. Also, philosophy is relevant in research, particularly ontological and epistemological positions on research generated knowledge.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 7 months ago

    Actually, English majors have been hired at a faster rate then engineering majors the past 10 years or so because employers value good communication skills. You need to adjust your assumptions. Law schools also actively recruit English majors because, they say, they can teach law to someone with good writing skills, but they can't teach writing skills to people who don't have them. And writing briefs is mostly what a junior lawyer does.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Mike
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    The events of our time are not unique. They have happened before and have been dealt with before. STEM won't help you understand them.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 7 months ago

    I am not opposed to taking several courses in these areas to round out my knowledge, but there is a close to zero job market for these degrees. Some elitists will maintain that majoring in these areas will make you a "critical thinker." That is nonsensical, but they want to protect their jobs teaching stuff that nobody cares about.

    • Diane A
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      again, false assumption

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 7 months ago

    These majors usually result in good writing skills, communication, and critical thinking skills among others. The whole world does NOT have a STEM degree, and there are literally thousands of careers these majors could lead to.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Diane A
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      yes you are ignorant Richard, many many of friends do not have STEM degrees (french, painting, renaissance art are 3, and they all make more than we do as ER docs)

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • .
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    If they are combined with a STEM degree, quite a lot. There is a professor at Stanford with dual appointments in the departments of Psychology and Computer Science.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.