Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 6 months ago

how much gravity is there between the earth and the moon?

Not on the moon, in the trip from earth to it. I know the moon has a small amount of it, but what about the space in between?

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    You don't seem to have an understanding of what gravity is. It's a force, not a thing you can grab hold of, so the question doesn't make much sense. And Newton's equation of gravity F=GMm/r² tells you the size of that force, where G is the gravitational constant, M is the mass of the Earth, m is the mass of the Moon, and r is the distance between them.

    There are also 5 Lagrangian points where the Earth's gravity and the Moon's gravity balance, so anything put at one of those won't move about much . These have been used to place space probes so they pretty much stay where they are put. For example, the James Webb Space Telescope is planned to be put at L2 so it should stay where it is exactly on the other side of the Moon. It will move about a bit but should be reasonably stable.

    So what you get between the Earth and the Moon is gravity that pulls you towards one or the other, depending on where you are. Of course the Moon is smaller so its gravity is the stronger only when you get quite close to it.

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  • goring
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    The earth and the moon both float and moving inside a fluid medium

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  • 6 months ago

    How far is Lagrange point 1 from the Earth and the Moon. That is where Earth's gravity and the Moon's gravity equal each other in OPPOSITE directions, BUT the Lagrange points, all FIVE of them, MOVE because the Moon does NOT have a circular orbit.

    Which set of units if force do you Wang the Moon's gravity to be in, newtons or foot pounds, kilometers or miles per second or hours? You can Google that. https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Locations-of-t...

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  • NONAME
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    enough to hold the moon in orbit and enough to pull the oceans off the earth...yes..the oceans are litterally pulled off the planet by a few feet...so in between earth and the moon the earth is pulling one way at about 3 times as strong as the moon is pulling the opposite way..

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  • D g
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    F = G M m/r^2

    you know the mass of the earth .. G is the gravitational constant ... 6.57 x 10^-11

    and the small m is the mass of the moon you can look that up.. then you can put in the value of the Radius of the orbit of the moon

    to find the gravitation produced by one of the objects like the earth you just remove the other m from the equation..

    g = G M/r^2

    what this gives you is the gravitational acceleration from the earth

    if you wanted the moons gravitational acceleration at any distance you use the formula

    moon = Gm/r^2

    where m is the mass of the moon .. and r is the distance from the center

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  • 6 months ago

    So, picture Earth, by itself, in space. The closer you are, the stronger it's gravity is. As you get further and further away, the gravitational pull of Earth drops. It never reaches zero, but it does get very weak.

    Now, picture the Earth and the moon, a good distance apart. In both cases, the closer you are to either body, the stronger the gravity from that body is.

    As you'd expect, there's a point where the moon's gravity equals the Earth's gravity; That's the "L1" point, and you could 'hover' there if you were to remain at that point. That point is about 36,000 miles from the moon, and about 200,000 miles from Earth.

  • Mark
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Earth is the only planet whose natural satellite is so large compared to the planet. But anyway, you can't measure an "amount" of gravity. There are spots ("LaGrange Points"), in which Earth and the Moon exert equal force. Two of them, L4 and L5, are quite stable and would be good places for a large space station. L1, L2, and L3 are not stable

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  • 6 months ago

    When you were about 90% of the distance to the moon the gravity would balance. Since travel from the earth to the moon is not direct but curved it would really complicate any calculations.

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  • 6 months ago

    Enough to hold the moon in orbit.

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