Any good clean book recommendations tailored to a young adult?: No cursing, violence, sex scenes, etc...?

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  • Spike
    Lv 7
    5 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

    Rumble Fish by S. E. Hinton

    That Was Then, This Is Now by S E Hinton

    The Year of the Gopher by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

    Wonder by R. J. Palacio

    I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World (Young Readers Edition) by Malala Yousafzai with Patricia McCormick

    Kingdom Keepers series by Ridley Pearson

    Kingdom Keepers: The Return series by Ridley Pearson

    Underwater: A Novel by Marisa Reichardt

    Not as Crazy as I Seem by George Harrar

    Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

    Show Me All Your Scars: True Stories of Living with Mental Illness by Lee Gutkind and Karen Wolk Feinstein

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  • 5 months ago

    Anything by Tolkien, Gerald N Lund, most biographies, most history,poetry--you might have to screen them if you are that worried:you know your child better than anyone. I will say as a teen and young adult, that stuff never bothered me, but books are different these days.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago
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  • Joe
    Lv 4
    5 months ago

    Dangerous Days and sequel Blades both by J. William Turner. No sex scenes or obscene language, but occasional violence relevant to the storylines. Each book about 400 pages written in first person narrative and set mainly in Australia with scenes in Canada, England and California

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    If the "young adult" (a.k.a. Teenager) likes romances, Harlequin's "Love Inspired" lines are very good. Harlequin Presents line is also good, but there may be some PG-13 words in them. I read Harlequins since I was 15 (in the 1970s) and my mother forbade only "the ones with the red covers" (The "Desire" and "Temptation" lines) as well as any covers where one or both characters were almost out of their [ripped] clothing.

    Some of the library's spicy adult historicals were in hardcover, without their dust-jackets. Actually, the values I took to heart from my parents and church made me uncomfortable with spicy and red-hot romances until I graduated high-school. I preferred Jean Plaidy's, Nora Lofts', Georgette Heyer's and Margaret Campbell Barnes' historicals and Barbara Cartland's romances (though Ms Cartland's were much of a sameness read one after the other.)

    I found the novels I read for class from Grade Eight onward were more disturbing. Crime and Punishment, The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence, Animal Farm, Who Has Seen the Wind, Fahrenheit 451, Peace Shall Destroy Many, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and, of course, Shakespeare's plays. Adult with a Big A adult books. Books that were supposed to make us aware of the "real world" situations, and make us think. We were directed to read the newspapers too - at least the Saturday editions if our parents didn't get the paper each day. Fahrenheit 451 turned me against "science fiction", and I never did understand all of "Crime and Punishment", but I would point them out to youth over 16 now as worthwhile reads. I think I was emotionally or mentally too young for them all at 14 and 15.

    Read biographies. I read and was inspired by biographies about Florence Nightingale, Harriet Tubman, Edith Clavell, and other notable women. If you're an American, you should know about your presidents and people like Lewis and Clark, Sitting Bull, the "colored" regiment from Massachusetts who was one of the first to fight and be massacred in the U.S. Civil War. The same with people of other nations. I found it a lot easier to enter the adult world through those adults' stories than through Orwell's and Bradbury's dystopias. I've been a Sherlock Holmes fan and a Titanic "student" since age 9 and "A Night to Remember" by Walter Lord. The Titanic book was my first encounter with a tragic accident through the experiences of ordinary people, and Mr. Holmes was a genius, but not a superhero.

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  • 5 months ago

    Can this child read at an adult level, like teens ought to be able to do? Then they can enjoy Brendan Sanderson's fantasy works, Tony Hillerman's mysteries, and lots more.

    But I concur with others who note that shielding a teen from strong language, sexual situations, and other "adult" goings on in fiction is doing them a huge disservice. We let our kids read anything but hardcore porn starting around age 12 or so.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    How about reading an adult book? It won't kill you.

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  • Ludwig
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    This is kind of a retarded young adult?

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  • Zac Z
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    A young adult, given that they will be a "proper" adult quite soon, should be able to cope with some cursing, book violence, or sex scenes. Or are you going to try to shield them from life until they're 50?

    That said, how do you expect to get helpful recommendations if all you say is that you want to have a "clean" book?

    To get helpful suggestions, you'd need to tell us a bit more. What is this young adult interested in - genres, topics, settings, etc.? Are there any books this young adult was allowed to read and liked?

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  • 5 months ago

    the bible is a good one

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