promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted

When applying to a Master's program, if a school has a minimum GPA requirement and my undergrad GPA is below it, should I just not apply?

So after 2 years of law school and realizing that it wasn't something I wanted to do as a career, I withdrew myself from the school. Since I now only have my BA to go on, my family and I decided that I should try to get into a Master's program so I can stand out a little when I do finally apply for a job.

But my undergraduate GPA was only a 2.90, and every single schools I've been looking at require a 3.0 minimum (unless work experience is exceptional) in order to event apply. Based on that, should I just not bother attempting to apply? Or could I make up for that with a well-written personal essay/statement?

6 Answers

Relevance
  • 9 months ago

    IF you do not meet any of their requirements, you cannot apply. You cannot make up for a low GPA with some personal essay. Most grad schools require minimum GPA of 3.25, and any GPA below that does not bode well for admission to grad school, or for surviving to actually earn a master's degree. Grad school is not for you.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 9 months ago

    You could make up with that with a well-written essay. Lots of schools are looking for diversity, so if you are "special" in some way, discuss that in your essay. Good luck!

    Source(s): Master's Degree in educational field
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 9 months ago

    One big source of money for schools is from wishful applicants, application fees are expensive and they get tons.

    A 2.90 for a 3.0 minimum GPA would only be excusable if there was something else to make this gap small or otherwise make the measurement itself not useful (i.e. if you're 45 years old, having a 2.90 GPA in undergrad is just too long ago to mean anything definite about who you are now).

    In your situation, you'd need either some great job experience, some soaring recommendation letter from a legend, or you would have had to have gone to a top school that would make your 2.90 more impressive (i.e. a 2.90 at University of Michigan means more than a 2.90 at Western Michigan University; the fact is that the latter school is very easy while the former is tougher and it's harder to achieve that GPA at a harder school).

    While it's a very hard pill to swallow, I'd discourage applying to those universities, you are just going ot be donating lots of money to the universities in the form of application fees.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 9 months ago

    It depends on whether or not you can afford the application fee and time to apply. As others have noted, some schools have hard cut-offs and simply won't look beyond the GPA and GMAT or whatever test score. Other programs may have a more wholistic approach based on the competitiveness of the program.

    I might also suggest that you stop hiding in school and try to get a job. You've already spent six years in college, right? Did you work or do internships at all during that time? Assuming you won't start a Master's program until next summer at the earlier, you really should get a job. Go through the process of applying and interviewing. Make some money. Get experience.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • .
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Yes. Because in reality, the GPA needed for admission is based on the competitiveness of the applicant poor. For example, I had a 3.86 GPA and got denied by about half the graduate schools I applied to.

    A well-written personal statement won't help you much. A stellar GRE, MCAT, GMAT, LSAT (etc.) score would look much better.

    However, keep in mind that in some programs, they look more at your major GPA. That's true in many CS programs.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • MS
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    When minimums are set, they generally will not consider anyone below that. We have minimum GPAs for our masters and doctoral programs, and we do not consider applicants who have GPAs below that level - the rest of their application is not even examined. You could reach out to those programs you are considering and see what they say though - perhaps they will still consider you with other exceptional application components.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.