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Why didn't the ERCOUPE airplane have rudder pedals? Isn't that counter intuitive?

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  • 9 months ago
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    The idea was that interconnected controls [rudder and aileron] would be MORE INTUITIVE, safer and simpler to fly. With a yoke similar to a steering wheel on a car and a single brake pedal on the floor, also like a car, the intent was to simplify flying and make it more appealing to average people who already knew how to drive a car. With interconnected rudder and aileron, cross-controlling [a contributor to spins] wasn't possible. With limited elevator authority, it was also difficult to stall - the aerodynamic stall being the other ingredient of the spin. If an aircraft couldn't spin, it would be much safer.

    To sum up, ostensibly simpler, more intuitive to the novice, and safer was a powerful marketing approach.

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  • FanMan
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    When the Ercoupe was designed,as today, the biggest cause of light plane fatalities was stall/spin accidents. The idea behind the Ercoupe was that if you eliminated stalling by limiting elevator travel, and eliminate spinning by taking the rudder pedals away from the pilot, instead linking the rudders to the ailerons. There's more to it than that but that's the general idea.

    In practice, it worked... sort of. Ercoupes indeed never have stall/spin accidents... but everything in aviation is a compromise, and the things the designers did to prevent stalls and spins had other undesirable effects on the airplane's handling, so overall the Ercoupe's safety record isn't that much better than its contemporaries.

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  • 9 months ago

    It was coupled like a toy rc plane

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  • Dick
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    The Ercoupe had coupled ailerons and rudders. No pedals needed. It was a sales feature. It was supposed to be virtually stall and spin proof. They were built. manufactured and/or owned, by several entities from before WW!!, until the late 1960s. Among them were Erco, Aeronca, Alon, inventer J.D. Forney, and Mooney. Supposedly, it took significantly fewer hours of training to learn to fly with an Ercoupe.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    Same reason the older Beech Bonanzas. simply had one control. To make it more appealing to masses. A single yoke is like a steering wheel; the rudder pedals are counter-intuitive to a car driver.

    In Beechcraft's case, it wasn't to reduce cost. The Bonanza was actually expensive. It was designed to appeal to MD's, etc. It was so hard to pull out of a stall, they were called "Doctor Killers".

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  • 9 months ago

    Because that was the idea: to make the plane such that the rudder would be applied proportionally and automatically though the control yoke, making rudder pedals redundant.

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  • 9 months ago

    maybe they didnt think it needed it

  • 9 months ago

    Not really required since the rudder was tied into the control yoke to simplify flying the machine.

    There was a kit to add rudder pedals for flight schools. No idea if it sold well.

    And it got pedals when Mooney bought the company and switched to a single rudder.

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  • 9 months ago

    No such plane as the "ERCOUPE". There is one called "EROCOUPE". See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ERCO_Ercoupe

  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    So flight instructors would not have to yell so much.

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