How would one address a non-noble knight when responding to them? Time Period: high middle ages. Europe?

In Europe, during the high middle ages, how would someone address a non-noble knight when asked a question or told to do something by the knight? I know that when first addressing the knight one would call him Sir "such-and-such," but how would the knight be addressed thereafter? Example (knight's... show more In Europe, during the high middle ages, how would someone address a non-noble knight when asked a question or told to do something by the knight?

I know that when first addressing the knight one would call him Sir "such-and-such," but how would the knight be addressed thereafter?
Example (knight's name is Aaron):

Commoner: Sir Aaron, your lady calls.

Knight: Tell her I shall be there shortly.

Commoner: Yes, Sir Aaron.

Knight: And fetch some water. I wish to bathe after supper.

Commoner: Yes, Sir Aaron.

Knight: And have the rounceys been fed?

Commoner: I do not know, Sir Aaron.

Knight: Then speak to the stable-boy and see that they are fed.

Commoner: Yes, Sir Aaron.

Knight: And have the boy saddle my palfrey.

Commoner: Yes, Sir Aaron.


I'm writing a book, and after a while the "Sir Aaron's" seem out of place. I know that Sir Aaron wouldn't be addressed as "Lord Aaron" (because he's not a noble), but when being answered, could he be called "my lord"? Would the "Sir Aaron" be shortened to "sir"? What are some allowable responses?

That's my question. How would someone address a non-noble knight when asked a question or told to do something by the knight? Would they keep saying "Yes/no, Sir Aaron", over and over again? Or could the knight be addressed as "my lord" or something else?

What would be some proper/allowable responses for: commoners, nobles, and knights of equal status?

Time Period: high middle ages. Europe
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