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Can a song have different measures in the verses?

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  • JonZ
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    A measure is the section of a ​musical staff that comes between two barlines. Each measure satisfies the specified time signature of the staff. For example, a song written in 4/4 time will hold four quarter note beats per measure. A song written in 3/4 time will hold three quarter note beats in each measure.

    I think want you mean to ask is can a song have different time signatures, and the answer is yes.

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  • 9 months ago

    .........................................

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  • Tony B
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Different to what? Your question doesn't make sense without more information.

    I bet you're not going to give it though.

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  • 9 months ago

    Erik, you have not asked a meaningful question. Do you mean can there be a different number of measures? Or something else? Each measure is different because it has different notes in it.

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  • 9 months ago

    Yes, I do believe so.

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  • 9 months ago

    Do you mean

    Verse 1 is 8 measures, verse 2 is 10

    Verses are all 16 measures, choruses are 8

    Verses have 1 or more irregular measures (i.e one of 2/4, the rest in 4/4)

    You can have all of them, although some features are more common than others. Dropping in an occasional irregular bar is a well-used technique although not done so much in pop today, it was used quite a bit in the 60s and 70s. It is extremely common to have a chorus that is of a different length to the verse. It is unusual to have verses that are different lengths - particularly SHORTER than the usual pattern. Probably the most common example would be a paused measure at the end - so having 2 verses with 16 measures and the last with 17.

    It really depends what you want to do and how it fits with the style. The vast majority of modern popular music is *extremely* simple, and you might alienate listeners by being 'too clever' and deviating too much from what is expected - regular sets of measures divisible by 4. Then again they may welcome the freshness of something a little unusual if it's done well.

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