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Do colleges/universities help you find a job?

I'm going into my Junior year of high school and I've been having a bit of an existential crisis. I want to be a wildlife biologist, so I may major in environmental science or ecology, I'll be taking APES this year. Anyways, I've heard that it's difficult to find a job in wildlife biology, and I'm a bit terrified that this will all backfire on me. I really do want a job where I can help the environment. So after 4 years of college, do they help you find a job, or are you on your own after that? Thanks for any responses. :)

14 Answers

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  • 9 months ago

    Keep in mind that you don't have to be walking around in national parks counting cougar scat or dealing with plague-infested prairie dogs to be making an environmental difference. You can also be a lobbyist or government specialist who works as a writer, researcher or adviser at the state or national level. A semester or summer internship in Washington, your state capital or a national park could help land a permanent job after graduation. If you want to be actually working in a national park or wildlife area, it would help to attend school in or near those areas.

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  • 9 months ago

    No, not exactly. Most universities have a career placement or similar office as well as an alumni network. Most also host information events where an employer would come to the campus to present information and recruit applicants. These are all resources for students. That noted, it is not a university's responsibility or focus to place graduates into jobs -- you'll need to do that yourself.

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  • di
    Lv 4
    9 months ago

    Check with state, federal and local park systems for entry level positions. Also check with state and local environmental or natural resources agencies - positions might range from water sampling to wildlife inventories to nature walks to game warden positions.

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  • 9 months ago

    Universities typically have a Placement Office where employers can list openings, recruit new/recent grads. Obviously, they only recruit from a very few schools - e.g. the highest rated school in that field, or local employers will recruit at the local university.

    You're expected, by the time you graduate, to be sufficiently astute & adult to take full responsibility for yourself. Including learning practical skills like how to write a resume & cover letter, research job openings, interviewing skills, etc. NO school is going to find you a job. YOU do all the research, job hunting, etc. The Placement Office may be one resource for advice, but they are not going to find you a job or do any legwork for you.

    BTW, start doing your homework NOW. Which universities have the highest rated programs in wildlife biology? And expect to need at least a master's degree. And check out the US National Park Service - what are they looking for in park rangers & various specialists these days? Who else looks for wildlife biologists & what, exactly, do they expect?

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  • drip
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    They will help your with your resume, perhaps interview skills. Hold job fairs, although I don’t think you will find many companies there looking for a wildlife biologist.

    You will need at least a Masters degree and many in the career have a doctorate degree. Average pay is around $50,000. Which is pretty low for having a Doctorate degree.

    https://work.chron.com/much-money-wildlife-biologi...

    https://study.com/articles/How_to_Become_a_Certifi...

    Do a lot of research in jobs. Look at federal jobs.

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  • :)
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    There is no wildlife biologist major. You’d either major in environmental science, or biology it sounds like. There are a wide variety of jobs in those fields, so because it’s so broad, you’re less likely to get one on one help, like you might get if you were in a highly specialized major such as nursing or teaching.

    However, schools hold jobs fairs like all the time. Attend those. Build relationships with professors; especially the ones who have done things similar to what you want to do. That will give you bc connections and resources. See if you can volunteer/work at a zoo. Start networking ASAP. If you’re passionate enough, you will find something.

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  • 9 months ago

    Doing volunteer work in your field, will help you later getting a job.

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  • cool
    Lv 6
    9 months ago

    Emphatically, no.

    Don't be tricked into thinking that the only way to become a scientist is to attend university.

    Trying to become a scientist is like trying to become an elite sports athlete, you have to practice/study on your own.

    Nobody else will teach you. The lecturers who teach are actually indoctrinating their students. Take DNA for example, according to the DNA polymerase chain reaction, DNA is heated to 40 degrees Celsius, causing it to split. It is then cooled down, causing it to come together again in perfect alignment.

    This is an obvious hoax, are we really supposed to believe that the most complicated substance could be heated, cooled and reheated without any lasting structural change.

    Don't study science at university, focus on being a scientist...

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    • cool
      Lv 6
      9 months agoReport

      Hi Lilli, which parts do you object to most strongly? The DNA part, or the part about university being bad?

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    College gives you a shot at finding a job. Good luck trying to be a wildlife biologist without a college degree.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    They will organize job fairs to have companies come on campus, advertise what positions they have and interview students or at least they did when I graduated. But they aren't going to have a group trying to find you specifically a job.

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