Conditional statements are always written in if-then form. True or False. Explain?

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  • 6 months ago

    you can re-write all such statements into some sort of "if-then" form, but they do not have to be written that way.

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  • Julien
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    In grammar, definitely not.

    In maths neither. Example : "p | (a^p-a) for any prime p" looks more like a then-if

    In computer science neither. Some languages have the unless instruction, some can put the if at the end, and implicit conditionals are often used.

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  • 6 months ago

    A conditional statement, symbolized by p q, is an

    if-then statement in which p is a hypothesis and q is a conclusion.

    The logical connector in a conditional statement is denoted by the symbol .

    The conditional is defined to be true

    unless a true hypothesis leads to a false conclusion.

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  • Sky
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    False. For example:

    "I'll give you back the tools I borrowed when you pay me the money you owe me."

    or

    "You'll get a raise as soon as you start getting your work done on time."

    Those are conditional statements that did not use an if/then combination.

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