Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentMilitary · 11 months ago

Would the military pay for me to go to CRNA school? If so what's the catch?

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  • Jason
    Lv 7
    11 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The catch is that you already have to be a nurse with a BSN, be a commissioned officer, and have at least three years of critical care experience in the military as well as a strong academic record. CRNA school is 2-3 years depending on the program, so you would owe a service commitment of 4-6 years thereafter.

    Your competition to get into the program are other nurses in the military with experience. Like anything competitive, you have to compete. If you're already a nurse with a BSN, your first step is talking with a recruiter. The Army has consolidated recruiting; the USAF and Navy do not. They have different recruiters for officers. If you have a BSN and are otherwise qualified, you can come in on a direct commission as a 2nd lieutenant. Put in your time as a military nurse, get some ICU experience, and put in your package for CRNA school. If you're accepted, you'll be on pay status while you attend school and they'll foot the bill. Then you owe your service commitment. If you drop out of the program or don't complete your service obligation, they will reclaim the money they spent.

    It's a program for career military nurses. It's competitive to get into and it comes with a significant obligation afterward. They don't want to spend all that time and money training someone who is just going to get out. They need CRNAs, not graduate students. It's not a jobs program, its purpose is to fulfill a critical need in military health care. They want to make sure those nurses are going to stick around. So they start with nurses who have already been in for a while and they obligate them to further service. If you've already been in for 4-5 years before you're accepted to school, put in another 2-3 years there, and then have to serve another 4-6 after that -- you're already at 10-15 years. Might as well stick it out to retirement at that point if it's only another five years. They want career nurses.

    Alternatively, you can enlist, serve your commitment, get out, get your BSN, then use your GI Bill to cover graduate school. That would also technically be the military paying for CRNA school.

    If your intent is to find a cheap way to get a degree that pays six-figures, this isn't the program for you.

    Best wishes.

    .

    Source(s): Former USAF flight medic and training manager
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  • 11 months ago

    The catch is some form of service commitment, and the programs are competitive. Becoming a CRNA is an advanced practice. In most cases a service will require you to be a fully qualified RN-BSN, be currently enrolled in a CRNA program (in which loan repayment programs exist), or apply for training through a military health school.

    https://www.usuhs.edu/content/crna-admissions-requ... Awards DNP for CRNAs

    The Air Force has the Health Professionals Scholarship Program available. If you apply they would cover the tuition for some or all of your training in CRNA school. But it's highly competitive, and full rides are normally for physicians.

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  • 11 months ago

    You would have to be an R.N. first. You have to have a commission in the service. You have to apply for it and if they select you they will send you to the school of their choice. You will most likely graduate with a doctorate degree. The CATCH is you have to keep your grades up, stay out of trouble, continue to meet all the fitness standards and after you graduate you owe them five years of service as a CRNA. You would have to do it in the Army, USAF or Navy because the Marines and Coast Guard do not have their own medical staff.

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  • RICK
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Finish nursing school with a BSN, join the military, after 4 years of service, 2 of which must be in ER, Recovery, ICU or CCU you can apply to go to CRNA school. If selected they will pay for school plus psy you your salary and after you get certified you owe the service 5 more years

    The time constraints were for the US Navy when I was in, like many other things in the military they may have changed since I retired

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  • 11 months ago

    sure, after you enlist and serve 4 years in the military

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  • Daniel
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    They would only pay for you to go to CRNA school if you were already a nurse in the military. In exchange for sending you to school, you would owe them about double the length of the school on active duty. Also, it would be a competitive selection for the program--they aren't going to pay for every random nurse that wants to go.

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  • Mrsjvb
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Only via a Nurse Option ROTC scholarship. most branches don’t even offer them any more, but the ‘catch’ is serving as an Officer for 5-8 years.

    If you get selected for specialty training once in, it’s usually 2 years continued service for every year if schooling

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  • 11 months ago

    The military does not pay for you to go to school. They pick up tuition when you qualify. The schooling cannot interfere with your duties if you are active duty. Or, you can qualify for ROTC.

    CRNA school is a nursing school, so they certainly will not pay for that if you are not active duty. Nurses earn their degree, THEN are recruited.

    • USAFisnumber1
      Lv 7
      11 months agoReport

      CRNA is a masters level post graduate program, it is not a "nursing school." Most of the programs are moving to a doctorate level and if you graduate from one of those, you would be referred to as DOCTOR rather than by your rank. (The MDs and DOs will hate that.)

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