Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsOther - Science · 6 months ago

What temperature ranges are below absolute zero?

there's a backwards on any number line, and there's probably no absolute anything

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I guess, start at -1 Kelvin or Rankine? No reason why nothing can Get below 0 K , or -273 C. That would be -274 C. Its just that no more molecular movement seen at absolute zero. It won't get any "less" or "go backwards" any more than freezing water to 0 F makes it "harder" than at 31.

    People used to think Sun orbited Earth, and Earth flat. Fahrenheit put Zero on his scale because it was lowest he could record. People also

    thought atoms indivisible. And, X-rays harmless because you can't feel them. Also very recently thought only 3 particles to the atom.

    I understand those who argue that temperature is a measurement of average kinetic molecular motion., and no motion means, in this sense, no temp. But, if instruments record a number below absolute zero, it is still a valid reading. The molecules will not get "stiffer" or have less motion. Freezing H20 to 0 F makes it no "harder" than at 31, as said; but it does require more heat or time to go back to liquid. Think of it That way.

    And ,the practical problem of any sensor reading anything when its molecules are now at absolute rest. Again, we once thought Earth Flat, too..

    With vacuum, if you have an absolute of zero microns (in practicality, impossible), you cannot go "negative", no. But , this is different concept.

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  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    That's highly theoretical, and may involve things like negative gravity and negative resistance (=drag)

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  • MARK
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    There is no lower temperature than absolute zero. Everything stops moving at absolute zero and there is no heat. A temperature cannot be lower. That is the reason it is called absolute zero.

    • Road Warrior6 months agoReport

      40 Below zero, Celsius, is -40 C.

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  • Tom
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    How can there be a number less than absolute Zero?----when all motion of atoms and molecules stops? Can they move any "slower" than not moving at all? Like asking "which dead person in the graveyard is the deadest?"

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  • 6 months ago

    Technically, there *is* no temperature measurable below absolute zero. However, there's a report that a few atoms *were* made colder than absolute zero: https://www.livescience.com/25959-atoms-colder-tha... - it's an interesting read...

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  • 6 months ago

    Absolute zero is a limit which can't be reached, like the speed of light. It always takes the same amount of energy or more to halve a temperature, so you can get closer and closer to it but never actually get there.

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  • Athena
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    So far we have not found a negative temperature.

    Sort of a negative molecular motion.

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  • 6 months ago

    Absolute zero means absolutely no movement of anything. No molecule. No atom. No subatomic particle. Nothing. There is no way to get any colder than that. There is no such thing as negative movement.

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  • 6 months ago

    There is none. Zero degrees Kelvin or –273.15 degrees Celsius is that point where all energy is removed from matter.

    Electrons no longer orbit their nucleus, their valance is zero

    There is no more heat energy to remove so no negative temperature below absolute.

    The definition of absolute should have told you this.

  • 6 months ago

    there is no temperature below absolute zero.

    Just like there is no negative inch or negative pound.

    • Road Warrior6 months agoReport

      Negative inches are just going the other way. Space is infinite.

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