Ava asked in PetsBirds · 6 months ago

I've had my female cockatiel for about 6 months now, and every day, I wolf whistle in hopes she'll repeat but have had no luck. Suggestions?

She's nearly a year now, and she's a cinnamon cockatiel.

6 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    Well I have found that the males are more receptive to mimicking than the females and I have had a female that whistled but they are few. Keep trying.

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  • Kim R
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Males usually pick up on things like this more quickly, buy if you do this about a hundred times a day, she may pick up on it, especially if treats are involved.

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  • 6 months ago

    just don't give up she will learn soon :))) maybe do it when you are giving her treat or when cleaning the cage

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  • Dale-E
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Not all birds have the same intellectual capacity. Believe it or not, in many ways, little Budges are able to talk much better than a Cockatiel. An yet they are both complicated individually. The Mynah bird beats them all, hands down, in being able to mimic sounds, not counting some of those from New Guinea.

    In short, Cockatiel gets an A+ for effort. Talking is not their strong point. But their trying will win your heart.

    Now write this down:

    Little birds learn in their sleep. You have to cause it to dream.

    Think of every other wild bird you have experienced in your life time, especially a Wren, then, a Mocking bird.

    Their profound similarity is seen in the way they have a pattern of saying the same things over and over, all day long. Now you are the one that needs to think like a bird. If your little one is to have a dreamy relationship with you. Stop training your bird, you are the one that needs training. When you become as a bird to it, dreams will follow. WHAT???

    Good question, I thought you would never ask!!

    Forget all of the above. But write this down.

    "Wolf whistle" non-stop! Every time you come into its presents. All the while you are tending to its cage.

    When it begins to wolf whistle, add on "Pretty Bird" When it starts trying to say that, add in, "What Ya doing, Huuhhhh?" At this point your bird is working you. "Wolf whistle, Pretty Bird, What ya doing Huhhhh" all day long till the family is ready to kick you and your bird out of the house. As its dream life explores what is in its ears, it will pick up your sounds faster and faster.

    We do that too, really. A translation work That operates muscles goes on in our sleep. From one sensory realm, back to the muscular realm, then to a critical analytical process back to its muscular adjustment training and out again, with its dream life working overtime.

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    • Dale-E
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Very powerful, but not that vocal, typically. But when protecting their family, their noise level will go off the chart.

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  • 6 months ago

    Birds only respond to voices/noise made by a human where you put allot of emotion into it.

    Example: You can quietly tell your bird 'good morning' for years and it will never say it. Hit you finger with a hammer and scream out, "Sh!T!" and the bird will instantly say it.

    That, and do you reward the bird every time you whistle? No? Then your bird has no incentive to make the sound! You should figure out what is your birds favorite food and only give it to the bird as a training treat. Do the whistle, then tell the bird "wolf whistle, that's a wolf whistle" and give it a treat 1 out of 3 times you do it. Give a reward when it makes the whistle but no reward if it says those words back to you. This way when you say 'wolf whistle' you get it.

    My birds, if you ask them 'are you a car?" they go 'beep beep'

    "Are you a cry baby?" They go 'wha, wha!!!'

    And my favorite, "Are you a squeaky toy?" and the mimic the sound a squeaky toy!

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I have no idea. Do you whistles once a day, multiple times a day?

    My bird whistles.

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