Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceTaxesUnited States · 6 months ago

Filing taxes when married?

Can my husband and I file separately? Who claims the kids? We’re not separated or divorcing I’m just tired of him keeping all of the tax return money and not giving me any. I work 60 hours a week and contribute to taxes I should be getting part of the return.

15 Answers

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  • 6 months ago

    You can, but filing separately will likely cost you a bunch of money.

    If he keeps all the money, you need to reevaluate your marriage.

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  • Amy
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    You CAN file separately, but the two of you will pay more tax in total if you file separately than if you file jointly.

    Either of you is allowed to claim any or all of the kids, so just discuss it and decide how to divide them.

    The easier solution is to change your W4 so that you take home more money in your paycheck instead of getting it as a tax refund.

    Another easy solution? Have the refund deposited to a joint account instead of apparently one in just your husband's name. Your name is on that check; your husband can't "keep it" from you without your permission.

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  • 6 months ago

    You can file separately when you initially file for a year. However, if you file jointly for a year, then you cannot amend to filing separately for that year.

    Also, you still might not get any tax return money. For a variety of technical reasons, there is often less money, or no money, when filing separately.

    If you, your spouse, and the kids all live together, then either of you can claim the children. Either of you can claim all of the kids or you can each claim one kid. But you can't both claim the same child.

    If you can't agree and you both try to claim the same child (or all of them), then the IRS lets whomever makes more money claim the children.

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    You can file separately but you might lose a lot of advantages. You decide who claims the kids. If you can't agree, the person with the higher income claims them.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I used to be married to an idiot like yours. I routinely filed "Married-Separately" for various reasons, the main one being that he was "self employed" and would not bother filing at all!

    Your marriage stinks and you really need to consider whether it's worth staying in it. It is no problem at all filing separately and the slight increase in tax is hardly a consideration. Just make sure you file before he does or refuse to sign the "Joint" tax return.

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  • 6 months ago

    His keeping the tax refund is not a tax problem, it’s a HIM problem.

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  • 6 months ago

    You can file separately but you will both be paying at the higher single rate. If you are married, neither one of you can file as Head of Household. This can cost you substantially extra in taxes and there may be no REFUND at all. Not a RETURN.

    You can have the attitude that what do you care if there's no refund if you don't see any of it anyway, or you can have the attitude that there's more money coming into the household. You need to have a discussion about sharing the refund, and if you can't do that, then there are much bigger problems than this that filing separately won't solve.

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  • 6 months ago

    You can file as Married-Filing Jointly or Married-Filing Separately.

    However, filing jointly may give you a better result. In some cases, it can give you a much better result.

    How a refund gets split is up to you two.

    One option would be to file jointly and use Form 8888 to divide the refund into multiple bank accounts. This can only be done with direct deposit; not with checks.

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  • 6 months ago

    Here is a novel idea. Both of you should adjust your allowances with your employers so that you are paying the correct amount of tax. Then there will be no excess tax returned to you at the end of the year. Why on earth would you even think of overpaying the US government thereby giving them an interest free loan for months on end?

    Another novel idea; do some proper budgeting with your husband. Work out what you both receive each year and what has to be spent. Then decide how much to put aside for savings. As a married couple, earnings are owned jointly by both of you. Nothing should be spent without the enthusiastic agreement of both parties. If that means you have to check in before buying lunch rather than taking a sandwich to work, so be it. You will be amazed at how much difference that makes to your relationship, let alone your finances.

    • Duck6 months agoReport

      This is the correct answer. Do not overpay your taxes, that is stupid.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Sure you can file separately and it does not make any difference who claims the children. But by doing this you will pay more in taxes than you will jointly.

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