Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 6 months ago

To be honest, is “the reason why winter is colder than summer” basically same to “the reason why high latitude is colder than low latitude”?

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  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    effectively, yes. winter is equivalent to moving roughly 45 degrees in latitude away from the equator compared to summer. where I live (about 45 N), the Sun at peak in dead of winter is very low (about a peak of 23 degrees above horizon on winter solstice) and reasonably high in summer (about a peak of 67 degrees on summer solstice).

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  • 6 months ago

    partly. mostly cause by earths orbit being farthest away from sun during winter.

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  • Tom
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    No, due to the Earth's tilt, the sun's rays are more direct in the summer time parts of the planet. or lower latitudes, At higher latitudes, the rays strike the Earth at more of an angle---Spreading the energy out over a wider area, and thus not heating it as well.----------The temperature difference with altitude is on a whole different set of principles.

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  • Athena
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Well, yes, basically.

    Though Winter is WARMER than summer blow the equator.

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  • 6 months ago

    Of course not..

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Basically yes. The angle the Earth is tilted AND where you are on it, compared to where the Sun is, determines how high it rises in the sky, and when it rises higher in the sky, the weather is hotter.

    The tilt gives us seasons, and it's midsummer when your part of the world is tilted most towards the Sun, midwinter when it's tilted furthest away. And the Sun can't rise so high at higher latitudes.

    So we have two things that affect the angle, and it's those combined that add up to make how high the Sun will rise today

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  • 6 months ago

    More or less

    And if you say so

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  • 6 months ago

    Yes, that's right. Solar angle determines the amount of energy is received in any particular area.

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  • 6 months ago

    Yes. Angle of sunlight.

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  • 6 months ago

    The immediate cause is the same (the sun being low in the sky, both in winter and at high latitudes), but the "basic" cause is NOT the same -- it would be colder at high latitudes even if the earth's axis were exactly perpendicular to the plane of its orbit. The winter/summer contrast results from the tilt of the axis.

    • daniel g
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      So you knock my post stating the same, but OK for you,,,HMMMM

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  • 6 months ago

    Yes, pretty much. It has to do with the axis tilted 23 degrees to the ecliptic.

    Summer, the northern hemisphere is tilted toward the sun meaning more direct sunlight.

    During winter, the opposite.

    We are soon coming to autumnal equinox, the tilt perfectly sideways to the ecliptic with the sun directly above the equator. Even then, at 45 degrees north or south, shadows match sunlight, effectively half if the radiant heat from the sun. further north or south, colder yet.

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