Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthMental Health · 6 months ago

Can a building actually sway?

In the wind? A strong building that has been there many years

In the office building, on the very top floor, there are basically two buildings and there is a corridor connecting them, the buildings are shaped like a H really and when you walk through the corridor between the two buildings, sometimes when there is wind, it is as though it actually sways.

Now can that actually happen or is it just possible anxiety? Though I am not the only person at work to notice ghost sensation.

8 Answers

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  • Adam D
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The Burj Khalifa sways up to 4 meters at the top when the wind blows.

    Everything deflects when loaded. Nothing is perfectly rigid. You probably wouldn't notice it in a 2 story building, because the movement is small, but it is there.

    Movement is expected in large structures, it is accounted for in the way they are designed.

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  • 6 months ago

    It is not ghosts. Buildings sway in the wind.

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  • Mr. P
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Yes they do. There are several buildings in Japan that are designed to sway enough to cope with the earthquakes, and have a counterweight in the centre that keeps them stable.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    You'll be OK in your basement, troll.

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  • 6 months ago

    Tall building MUST sway in the wind, otherwise they eventually break in strong winds.

    The Willis Tower in Chicago (used to be called Sears Tower) is designed to sway up to 3 feet (90 cm) either way (total = 6 ft); however, its average sway is around 6 inches (15 cm).

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  • marty
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Yes tall buildings sway.A forty-story building may sway a foot to the left, a foot to the right. The span of that period might last around four seconds. A hundred-story building, by comparison, may move on the order of two-and-a-half to three feet to each side

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  • y
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Yes and they are designed to do so.

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  • 6 months ago

    Of course, the CN Tower, for example, has quite a large sway radius

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