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Why is "A Christmas Carol" considered the best Christmas story of all time?

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  • 9 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Okay, let me first start by saying that is MY FAVORITE CHRISTMAS STORY EVER. I could see why it’s considered best of all time because it has an overall lesson for humanity. Dickens tells us through Scrooge that we must be kind and give back to our communities and to those who care about us. That is the spirit of Christmas. Scrooge’s experiences with the 3 ghosts show the importance of giving back and being selfless. This proves to be an eye-opening experience for him and so he becomes warm-hearted once more and starts to embody the spirit of Christmas. The fact that this story has a valuable lesson makes it very iconic as it shows us essentially what Christmas is supposed to be about.

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    • Sharon
      Lv 6
      9 months agoReport

      icky poo sentimentality, pure dreck like most of Dickens just worse than most of his writing

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    I'd give the "best Christmas story of all time" award to the story of Christ's birth in Luke's gospel, chapter 2. "A Christmas Carol" comes second. Scrooge had been abandoned as a child by his father, and despite his mentor and employer Mr. Fezziwig showing that he valued his employees as people, not as units of labour, by giving them a jolly Christmas party every year, Scrooge turned into a miser who "abandoned" both his employee Crachit, his nephew Fred (his beloved sister's only child) and his compassion for other human beings - He turned into his father (the abused into the abuser), as did his partner and fellow apprentice Jacob Marley. (Marley retorted when Scrooge said, "You were always a good man of business, Jacob." "Business! Mankind was my business!")

    Dickens did not write "A Christmas Carol" out of sentimentality. He wrote it to arouse real people like Scrooge and Marley to see and do something about the poverty, ignorance and want in their midst. Dickens had suffered poverty when he was a child. He walked the streets as a young adult, and saw the poverty he put into his stories. There is nothing "sentimental" about any of his stories other than "The Pickwick Papers", unless it was to rouse the sentiment of compassion. The reason that Christmas Present told Scrooge to "Beware Ignorance and Want" was that those skeletal children were poised to riot against the "men of business" and the government classes, the custodians of the "prisons and workhouses".

    I also have "It's a Wonderful Life", "Christmas on 34th Street" and "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" on my list of favourites.

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  • Sharon
    Lv 6
    9 months ago

    because sentimentalists just ooze delight that Scrooge abandons a lifetime of his practices, Tiny Tim is just so brave, and Crachit is icky poo.

    My former college professor, after he retired, wrote a far better version where Scrooge threatens the ghosts for annoying him and spoiling his sleep, and winds up owning every bank on Earth

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    I liked "Gremlins" better.

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