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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHigher Education (University +) · 10 months ago

If someone is bad at math, should they not even try to go to college to be a nurse?

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  • John
    Lv 6
    10 months ago

    You should not give up on your career goals due to an academic weakness. You can improve your math skills on your own.

    There are many books and websites available to learn the basics of math. Find out what grade level you are at by taking the quizzes in those books and/or websites. You will then know where to start your independent study. For example, if you do well on the 8th grade quizzes, but struggle with the tests for the 9th grade, start with the 9th grade material.

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  • 10 months ago

    Although math is needed to become a nurse, it is basic arithmetic (adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing) plus some algebra. I wouldn't not go into nursing because of a weakness in math. If you know it is a difficult area for you, be prepared to spend extra time studying and practicing. Ask for additional help or get a tutor early. Don't wait until you are behind in your work or its just before exams to ask for help. Good luck.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    Well you are required to take precalculus and chemistry(which involves math). So unless something changes with better teaching or some aptitude develops later in life it’s going to be hard if you did bad in math in high school. As in if you’re in remedial classes, repeating classes, or didn’t do well in algebra 2. I have seen people win the math and science award in high school but then only manage a D in precalc in college.

    • :)
      Lv 5
      10 months agoReport

      I’m a senior in the nursing program in the top 5% and I have never taken a pre calculus class ever. Also, many programs do not require chemistry. Mine does not

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  • :)
    Lv 5
    10 months ago

    Nursing is not very math heavy. As a senior in a very good program, the only math class I took was fundamentals of statistics (which is a joke of a class). Besides that, you will need to know how to do dosage calculations/unit conversions/dimensional analysis. This is just very basic algebra. Not hard at all. As long as you can do basic algebra/stats you’re fine. You don’t need to understand calculus or anything crazy.

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    • John
      Lv 6
      10 months agoReport

      Just as a note, I'm surprised statistics is considered an easy course. It used to be one of the most dreaded classes. That was in the days before calculators and computers, though, so that could be a big factor.

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  • 10 months ago

    If you have no talent for sciences and/or math, you do not belong in sciences, health-related occupations, etc. Where do your talents, abilities, interests, etc, really lie? Go with your strengths if you cannot overcome your weaknesses despite genuine effort.

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  • 10 months ago

    No; they ought to be able to get through most nursing programs.

    Unless they have an actual learning disability (dyscalculia), there's no such thing as "bad at math." They may not be interested in math, and therefore they don't want to put in the effort it requires, but if they -do- put in the effort, they can do well, at least up through calculus or so.

    Most nursing degrees require college algebra or statistics or both, but not any higher math like calculus. Neither is more advanced than high school level (algebra 2 plus trigonometry, or precalculus).

    A tutor is a good idea to help explain the concepts a little slower than the college professor, and be more willing to answer questions; the professor needs to cover the planned material so will limit the number questions she will answer in class.

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    i think they should at least try or get a tutor while theyre in college

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  • 10 months ago

    No matter what you do, professionally, you need basic math skills. If your math skills are poor, becoming reasonably proficient in math is not really a major obstacle. If you allow that to prevent you from becoming a nurse you are giving up way too early.

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  • 10 months ago

    You can get better at math. That is a fixable problem.

    When people are "bad at math" it is usually due to the age that they are exposed to it, and also due to their perception of how relevant it is to their lives.

    The world is full of people who get much better at math later in life.

    When you are forced to drill through that stuff as a hormonal 14 year old, math looks pretty terrible.

    But the more of life that you experience, the more fascinating math becomes for many people.

    In other words, I think that many people aren't in the right state of mind to be appreciative or curious about math when they are in high school, but that fascination can come later.

    To what extent would that affect someone wanting to train to be a nurse? I'm not sure. if someone wants to get into nursing, they should do it, give it their best shot. I'm no nurse, but I know that job is about a whole lot more than just math.

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  • 10 months ago

    Don't worry, 5 out of 4 people are bad at math. The only real career path available to you, that doesn't require math skills, is to be a politician.

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