Hündin asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 5 months ago

I'm watching a documentary about WW2. In it fighter planes are using laser guns to shoot at each other. Why aren't they used today still?

Fighter planes are shooting what looks like pulses of high energy light at each other, and warships are equipped with the technology too. If laser weapons existed in the 1940s, why are they no longer in common use today? Is it because of the Geneva Convention?

Update:

Thank you to the three people who spotted I was talking about tracer rounds. To the other eight respondents - I slightly despair for you.

14 Answers

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  • Ludwig
    Lv 6
    5 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    No. Those are 'tracer' bullets. There is a chunck of phosphorous which follows the round, and burns as it goes. This shows the pilot where the normal bullets will land. In a belt of machine gun ammunition, you might have every fifth round a 'tracer' bullet.

    • Inquizetif
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Eva, there are so many morons on this site it's hard to tell who is truly that ignorant and who is trolling. This site is for asking questions but nice that you waste people time with your pathetic "joke".

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  • 5 months ago

    What the planes (and tanks, and infantry, too!) are shooting at each other are bullets with a special phosphorus coating which ignites while the bullet is in flight. These bullets are called "tracers," because they allow the shooter to "trace" the path of the fired rounds.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Oh yeah I'm like watching the same documentary like totes, imma gonna ask the same too cos I don care if purple think I m stupid

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Double face palm.

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  • PAMELA
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    They did not exist in the second world war!

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  • Sharon
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    the laser was invented circa 1956, so whatever you are seeing is either fake or misinterpreted

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Sounds like you were watching a video game.

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  • 5 months ago

    No, and I doubt it's the Mandela Effect either. I think you can blame the film makers from which the 'documentary' clips will have been taken. They did however use tracer bullets later in the war and would probably have used plenty of them in remakes so that you could see the rounds better on film.

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  • 5 months ago

    Those were "tracer rounds". About every fifth round actually "burned" as it went through the air so the gunner or pilot would know where the actual bullets were gone. Side benefit was that it also clued in the gun operator when to let off the trigger and let the gun cool. One to two tracer rounds pause.

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  • 5 months ago

    That must be another excellent factual program considering that the first laser was created in 1960

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