Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesVisual ArtsPhotography · 11 months ago

I want to be a photographer. What's a good first camera ?

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    "To be a photographer" you need people-skills in bucket-loads.

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  • 11 months ago

    Nikon 3200 it has onboard instructions for

    getting the best from each image, so once

    You pick up the General ideas and finances

    Or economy improves you could get a 42mp

    Sony mirrorless or translucent mirror or STR.

    Thanks

    Very Best Wishes

    Mars

    Source:) Photography school

    50mm 1/8” portrait lens too.

    You can do astrophotography then too.

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  • Sky
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Any camera that gives you selective manual control over the settings for shutter speed, aperture, ISO, focus, and flash. Once you get used to operating the camera in automatic mode, and learn how to compose a good photo, you can start practicing with manual settings to get more specific results. You don't need to buy a DSLR starting out. My old camera is a Canon Powershot S5 IS, a point-and-shoot, and now that I know how to compose a good photo, that thing is capable of fantastic shots. When I didn't know much about photography I got a lot of crappy shots, and even after I got a good DSLR I didn't get very good shots until I learned more about photo composition and all the techniques for good photos.

    You can pick up a point and shoot camera for pretty cheap, and if you go with an older model you can get a nice camera for the same price or less than a new pocket camera. Don't bother spending a lot of money on a high end camera and top quality lenses until you know how to use a camera and understand the fundamentals of photography.

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  • 11 months ago

    Any DSLR will do . Nikon , Canon or Pentax ...

    I'd go for a refurbished Nikon D7000 with a 18-55mm lens .

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  • August
    Lv 6
    11 months ago

    Good luck with that. A good starter would be a Canon 400 DSLR with 2 lenses.

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Any one can be a photographer these days. All you need is the camera in your phone.

    How to be a good photographer is another matter. You have to learn the basic principles of photography first and for that you need a fully adjustable camera like the dSLR or mirrorless.

    When it comes to dSLRs and mirrorless cameras, there is no such thing as a beginner's camera. They are all basically the same. The cheapest ones have more point-and-shoot (compact camera) features and are actually trickier to use compared to the more expensive ones that have more relevant features. As a rule, buy the most expensive you can afford. It's cheaper in the long run (as compared to buying a cheap one then realizing it's not that fun to use so you buy another one later).

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  • Sumi
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Any DSLR or mirrorless is going to be more than good enough for a beginner. This is because of the main features that they all share such as full manual exposure along with aperture & shutter priority, program mode. They all have manual focus, auto focusing single-shot and continuous modes, too. They all have the ability to get various shots by utilizing technologies that aren't found in any other types of cameras such as point-and-shoot cameras, super-zoom cameras (which simply "look" like a DSLR but are really just point and shoots), and any smartphone.

    Now, with that said there are going to be some specific models that will be better for some users depending upon what they're doing. For example, those who need video capabilities will want to go with a mid or high-end Canon, Sony or Panasonic model because of their great video capabilities. For the same reason, those who need really good video performance would be best served by avoiding Nikon, Pentax and Fujifilm cameras. Another example would be someone who constantly shoots hand held in low light. Those shooters will need image stabilization. While in-lens solutions (ILS) from the likes of Canon and Nikon work very well, in-lens stabilization is not as good as in-body image stabilization (IBIS). For one, ILS requires specific lenses while IBIS works with any lens including old lenses from the 70s (such as with Pentax). ILS also require additional lens elements which means lower image quality, heavier and costlier lenses. For this reason, Pentax would be the best brand of DSLR, while Sony would be the best mirrorless option for those who need to shoot hand held in low-light situations.

    Overall there are no "bad" DSLRs or mirrorless cameras. However, there are some that do things better than others which means that there are going to be better bodies for each user depending up what they shoot and their overall needs. As a beginner, you probably don't have a real clear sense of what you really like to photograph or what you want to photograph, or what are some of the essential features for those types of photography. Nor are you likely to have a real grasp on the fundamentals of photography both on the technical and artistic side. All of this is fine as no one is born with this stuff already in their head. It takes years to learn it. An entry-level body will be more than good enough for a beginner to use in order to learn those things. And over time, say 1-2 years of constant use, then the user will have a rock solid idea of what they like to shoot, what they want to shoot, and what features that they need to do it.

    With this in mind, I'd recommend either a Canon T series such as the T5, T6 or T7, or a Nikon D5xxx series, or the Nikon Z6, or a Pentax K-70, or a Sony A6300, A6500 as really good entry-level cameras. I would skip the Nikon D3xxx series since this is the only line of DSLR without an internal focusing motor.

    But what if you already know that you need really fast continuous focusing because you already know that you need or want to shoot things like wildlife or horse racing or soccer, etc...? In this case an intermediate body like the Canon 77D, 80D or the Nikon D5xxx would be much better options than most mirrorless cameras (except for the Sony A9) and any DSLR from Pentax which is known for it's average focusing capabilities. But average isn't necessarily a bad thing, it's just not as good as the better AF systems found in the mid to advanced DSLRs from Canon or Nikon. Of course, if sports or very fast-moving subjects is not your thing, then the Pentax K-70 is unbeatable for its advanced features and overall capabilities.

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  • qrk
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Either a mirrorless or DSLR camera. Look at what Canon, Nikon, Pentax, and Sony have to offer. Entry models are perfectly fine for a beginner to intermediate photographer. These cameras allow you to use manual exposure and have interchangeable lenses. They also have large area sensors that give technically better results than smaller sensors found on phones and point & shoot cameras.

    Owning and knowing how to operate a fine camera is a first step. Getting pleasing images requires learning about photography which involves understanding composition and light. A good start is Bryan Peterson's book "Understanding Exposure". Perhaps your local library has a copy. While you can get by using automatic modes on a camera, expressing your vision comes with learning how to manually control your camera settings.

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  • Anonymous
    11 months ago

    I'm sorry for u and u have to be with me if

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  • 11 months ago

    You'll want to get a DSL with changeable lenses. I'd suggest a Canon Rebel.

    • Steve P
      Lv 7
      11 months agoReport

      That's DSLR.

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