Ciro asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 4 months ago

IS WORLD LIKE WE SEE IT?

Do we see world like it really is? WE don't see world directly but through light, so is it possible that the real world is different? If world isn't like we see it how is it possible that we can touch things that we see?( for example i can see my computer and i can touch it beacuse i see where it is)

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  • 4 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    We don't know what reality is really like. Our minds translate impulses from our senses into fictional qualli. Colors don't exist in nature. Only light of different wavelengths exists. Our minds invent colors and also sounds and smells. Even pain is just an illusion of the mind.

    When you touch an object, the sensation on your hand is a qualli in your mind also. We always see nature thru the veil of our consciousness.

  • Tom S
    Lv 7
    4 months ago

    There is much more than what we can see, or hear or feel. There are dimensions we can't even point to.

  • 4 months ago

    "Your life is always moving in the direction of your strongest thoughts". – Craig Groeschel

    Sometimes our thoughts might colour our perceptions.

  • 4 months ago

    The test of reality is consistency. The things that you feel, hear, smell, and taste are consistent with what you see. Your perception of the world today is consistent with what you experienced yesterday and all the days before. Compare this with what you remember of dreams.

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  • 4 months ago

    No. We don't see the absolute reality because we can't see with normal human eye.

  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    4 months ago

    Visible light covers less than two octaves of the EM spectrum, so we certainly don't see the world as it is, purely on the basis of failing to experience most of it at all. What we can say is that what we see has a strong correlation to certain aspects of an independent external world.

    What red "is like" for us is rooted in the physical mechanism by which we detect red and the mental interpretation and experience fabricated in our brains. A certain shade of red can be independently defined by a spectral response but our experience is essentially personal. Obviously there is strong agreement about what red is like among humans because we all share a very similar mechanism.

    The idea of colour blindness more or less assumes normal human vision is correct, and it certainly has greater resolution of frequency. But in principle we can imagine creatures that see across five octaves of visible light using twenty types of colour receptors in their eyes. To them, we would all be colour blind as a species, much like we regard the vision of dogs. And it is unlikely their experience or red (quale) would be like ours.

    But what the world "is really like" is probably a meaningless or oxymoronic idea because "being like" tacitly assumes a protagonist who can experience what things are like, while the phrase "is really like" is searching for an external independence of reality.

  • neb
    Lv 7
    4 months ago

    Think of what it would be like to be a neutrino. It has a much different view of the universe because it doesn’t interact with the strong nuclear force or the electromagnetic force (light). It can pass through the earth without interacting with it (although slight gravitational effect). The universe is a ghost to the neutrino.

    Your view of the world is pretty much determined by the fact that you interact with electromagnetism and gravity. Those two forces dominate your view of the world. The strong force and weak nuclear forces have a range inside of atoms - you don’t perceive them directly. If you did, your view of the world would be fundamentally different.

  • 4 months ago

    That is a massive question

    If you genuinely want to dive headfirst into the perception of our reality check out loop quantum gravity and string theory.

    It also goes into Solipsism and I have to suggest that you seem to be pondering an unanswerable question.

  • 4 months ago

    i think its how we see it

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