Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMaintenance & Repairs · 6 months ago

what would be the best thing to do about a rusted out "Battery seat"/"apron" in old truck trying to restore?

it looks like battery acid has eaten away at the entire engine apron /battery seat that the battery sits on...and was wondering how difficult a job for a welder, or what would be the smartest thing to do? (as you have to have a battery sitting on something to connect to engine)

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  • 6 months ago
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    Many of the older trucks are supported in the aftermarket,like Mid 50s, LMC and more. I was able to make a simple tray for a 1960 Ford truck by using the corner brace pieces and the hanging straps with just flat stock 16 gauge metal with a 90 degree on the end. Given a second chance I might have made it pretty but it's a work truck and no one looks. Had to bolt the piece I made into the salvaged stuff and primer painted it.

    Some more recent trucks bury the battery a little deeper or move it into the engine bay near the front fender/radiator section, those will need a near factory replacement more than a quick fix because of shape. Can clean up any of the corrosion hit areas, primer them up and coat them with more rugged materials than paint if you want to.

    EDIT: I would get a new tray off Ebay and hit the local self serve yard for the inner fender just because new tray has no rust and can maybe choose the inner fender, but finding a T 100 isn't easy. If you're resourceful, could get a piece of 20 gauge cold roll steel from Home Depot or whatever you can find cheap, and use a sandbag and hammer to shape it close to the inner fender curve,then pre-drill a few holes into what will be the patch you just made (leave some flat margins if you can for the holes). Primer the patch and put some RTV/sealant on the back side and use some self tapping screws to cover the rusty hole from the inner fender. That means you need a way to remove the rusty area (I have a couple grinders but have done chain drilling as needed too) or clean and primer it at the very least. Then you can back-spot the holes if needed for the tray. I have an advantage because I did 20 years of aircraft/airframe repairs on KC-135s so some of this is second nature to me. Betting you have a neighbor or co-worker who is a gear-head with enough knowledge to help you out for a 6 pack and some burgers off the BBQ. Getting a buddy to weld up something is an option if they have a skill set for it, but having to pay a guy to do the welding wouldn't be cheap.

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    • falconry2
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      I have a 1955 Ford F-100 Step-side. I'm swapping out the old front and rear suspensions for an IFS and newer 8.8 that I might 4 Link yet. Need to C notch the rear frame a little. Many old vehicles like my truck had the battery under the cab, closer to the starter.

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  • M.
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Battery tray?

    Old truck?

    Just WHAT is an "old truck"?

    Many of these parts are available.

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  • 6 months ago

    Steel is easy to work with if you have an grinder and a welder. The battery tray is basically a flat sheet with a rolled lip, with some "legs" to align it flat to the contours of the engine compartment. Cut out the old one with a grinder, make some carboard templates to get the shape. Cut steel sheet to the template, weld it all back up, prime and paint.... easy. Do as much of the work yourself will make it cheaper. Panel work is time consuming and time is money if you have to pay a pro metal fabricator.

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  • L.N.
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Try LMC Truck and search for a battery tray. http://www.lmctruck.com/

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  • 6 months ago

    You can purchase battery trays for most vehicles. More than likely cheaper than paying a welder to construct one. Cannot find a new one look at an auto salvage yard.

    • Lv 4
      6 months agoReport

      actually it is the engine apron that the battery tray sits on I think (if we are talking about same things)

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