Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 6 months ago

When will a human go to Mars?

11 Answers

Relevance
  • YKhan
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Humans will probably never bother with Mars, it's just not a good fit for us. We barely live in Antarctica right now, and that's on Earth, where we can get all of the oxygen and water that we need for living there. Sending humans to space seems to have become irrelevant, as robots are much more efficient and easier to send to space than humans these days. Back in the 60's, when the Moon race was on, computer technology had not yet advanced to points they are at now, so there was no choice but to send human astronauts, as they are more flexible in carrying out missions. But these days robots are very flexible too, just look at the Curiosity Mars Rover, it has a built-in laser beam to burn through Martian rocks and analyze their composition with spectrometers built into the rover itself! Not only is it doing geology by itself, it's also doing chemistry up there too!

    Now there is a worry that humans are running out of space here on Earth, as our populations keep growing. But evidence is already suggesting that human population growth has plateaued.

    Space travel for humans will happen if we have a destination to go to in space. So for the most part, nobody really has anywhere to get to in space right now. I think the first destination in space that humans will have a serious reason to get to will eventually be the Moon. As far as mining asteroids in space, I think that will be done mostly by robots, no need for humans.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 6 months ago

    I doubt I will be around to see it. Seen plenty in my day, man in space, color TV phones with buttons, aluminum coke cans, electric cars.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 6 months ago

    It will be sooner than you think

    Attachment image
    • Login to reply the answers
  • 6 months ago

    No nation has started a serious Manned Mars program as yet. Depending on the program, and the urgency to get to Mars, I would guess about 18 to 20 years from kick-off to boots on Mars. If we started *today* (and, we're not going to), then a landing by 2040 would be *possible*, allowing for mission concepts, vehicle and tooling design, manufacturing, testing, and final flight operations. The total program time could stretch to 25 years depending on budgets and - unfortunately - varying public support.

    As for when a program would *begin*.... that's hard to say... it would also depend on whether we're doing this as a solo nation, or as one of many that would participate. It's going to be difficult, and expensive - but, I think it should be done. Cooperation *out there* may lead to better cooperation *down here.*

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 6 months ago

    As soon as 300 billion dollars drops out of the sky and no one else besides Mars project promoters are interested in that money.

    Source(s): Bezos, Gates, Buffet, a few other geeks and maybe some sultans could swing it if they got together. Musk? Still dreaming.
    • Login to reply the answers
  • 6 months ago

    Never. If they did and the process continued, the chances of being alive before this happened would be too small for it to be realistic to be around right now.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 6 months ago

    More to the point: will they be able to come back again, alive.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • ANDY
    Lv 5
    6 months ago

    A human can go to Mars easily. We have been sending probes since the 1970's. Mars is close to Earth. It takes only several months to get there and land, especially when it's on our side of the sun and not opposite.

    The problem is that if we sent astronauts there, this doesn't necessarily mean we can "live" on this planet. The outcome would not be that of great success. Many problems are hindering opting to go there permanently.. They go from ultraviolet radiation to lack of oxygen in the right percentage of 20/21. Lots of other factors as you would expect (availability of water, food..etc) discourage going to "live" there.

    But, of course, missions, such as those of Apollo going to the moon, could be attained with no problem. But only for studies of our solar system. The moon was the first, Mars will be the second. Going farther than that will not be expected for maybe many decades.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Mark
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    2025., I think.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    It is widely believed that we will go to Mars by the mid to late 2020s, but that doesn't seem likely at this point.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.