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where do you think black holes lead to? do you believe in parallel universes?

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  • 10 months ago

    They lead deep into my Man Cave

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  • 10 months ago

    I don't think they go anywhere because there's no evidence of white holes, which is what would be on the other side, as it were. Yes I do believe in parallel universes.

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  • 10 months ago

    Black holes lead t9 a very dense mass, stars or even galaxies collapßed smaller than the moon. Gravity so strong even light can't escape.

    If you believe in that parallel universe BS, fine, I don't.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    Depends on the theory you use. General Relativity says it leads to a singularity at the center. However, some scientists have done calculations using newer theories such as Loop Quantum Gravity, and they believe that the inside is actually bigger than the outside! Using complicated maths, they believe that the inside of a black hole actually starts to open up and create its own spacetime, in other words it creates its own separate universe! And not only that, but the universe keeps growing and expanding over time, just like our universe does. Which would indicate strongly that our own universe must be the same way: a universe inside a black hole in a predecessor universe.

    Source(s): [1411.2854] How big is a black hole? https://arxiv.org/abs/1411.2854
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  • neb
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    There are a variety of exact black hole solutions to general relativity which describe the spacetime structure within black holes. Because they are exact solutions to incredibly complicated equations, they have been simplified to the extent that they are likely idealizations of ‘real’ black holes.

    With that in mind, the highly idealized solution of the simplest black hole, the Schwarzschild black hole, does have 4 distinct spacetime regions. One region is a black hole, another is a white hole, and two of the regions are what we consider ‘normal’ spacetimes. General relativity can’t tell us whether the two ‘normal’ spacetimes are the same universe or two separate universes. In any case, there is no way to traverse between the two spacetimes if they actually exist. And, as @Jeffreyk alludes to, it gets even stranger with rotating and/or charged black holes.

    So, while exact solutions of general relativity predict some really weird things, they likely don’t exist in reality

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  • 10 months ago

    Black holes don't lead anywhere but to a point singularity at the center. There is no evidence at all for parallel universes.

    However, the math of rotating black holes shows regions of space that could be separate universes. But we need a quantum gravity theory to know for sure. This is still an open question.

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  • cosmo
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    Black holes inevitably lead to death by extreme tidal forces.

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  • 10 months ago

    I don't think they lead anywhere.... if the massive star that lived & died, forming the black hole didn't lead anywhere... why would it's corpse...?

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  • 10 months ago

    @Josh where do YOU think black holes lead to

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  • 10 months ago

    A black hole is just a really dense object. It is not actually a hole. When something goes into a black hole it gets crushed and becomes part of the black hole.

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    • CarolOkla
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      A white hole, which is what the Big Bang was, a positive mathematical singularity with ZERO volume and ALL energy and undefined or zero mass. Your terminology and vocabulary is VERY important. A neutron star is NOT a black hole.

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