Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

1. Is this paragraph correct:

"My airplane wil arrive at 20:10 p.m.

I certainly hope that there will be no delays, and I will try to take the first train AFTER THAT TIME to get to your house."

(By 'after that time', mean the first train after I arrived the airport, have collected my luggage, and have passed through passport control desks.)

2. And is this sentence correct:

"I would like to ask for advice ON TRANSPORTATION to get to your house."

Or should I say:

"I would like to ask for advice ON WHAT TRANSPORTATION I SHOULD TAKE to get to your house."

6 Answers

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  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    1. "My plane will arrive at 8:10 p.m. (If you use the 24 hour clock you don't need to add 'p.m.' I certainly hope that there will be no delays and I will try to take the earliest train I can find to get to your house."

    Adding 'after that time' is obvious, so you don't need to say so.

    2. "I would like to ask for advice on transport to get to your house." People don't really use the word 'transportation' in informal communications.

    And as I've already mentioned - don't use commas before the word 'and'.

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  • 6 months ago

    If you are using a 24 clock, you don't need a.m or p.m.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    You do not use PM if you're using a 24-hour clock. Think about it. If you say "after that time' they might think you mean "after the time that Trump is re-elected" so you need to be more specific. Just kidding. You don't to say anything. If you say "I'll take the first train" and they can't figure out what that means, you probably don't want to go their house.

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  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    A is grammatically correct, but most communication is written and spoken simpler and clearer.

    "My airplane is scheduled to arrive at 20:10 p.m.

    "I hope there will be no delays, and I will try to take the first train after arrival."

    Planes run on schedules. "Certainly" adds no information. "Delays" can be "delay" if only referring to the arrival time. "To your house" should already be established as the destination. Since it cannot be "before that time", "after that time" is unnecessary.

    2. I don't like either for American English, though could be correct in British English.

    "I would like to ask" is unnecessary. You would like the information, not "to ask".

    Usually it is "about" rather than "on" for subject.

    What public transportation is available from the airport to your home?

    Can you recommend the best transportation from the airport to your home? [Americans use "can"]

    Please advise about the best transportation options from the airport to your home.

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    1] The sentence about arrival is correct. As is the sentence about catching the train. For 2] I might a say in Britain. "Could you please advise me about transport from the airport to your house." Note that Americans assay "transportation", but most Britons say "transport".

    Actually, a native speaker in Britain would say "My flight will arrive at.....", not "my plane".

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  • 6 months ago

    1. This doesn't sound quite right, it would make more sense to say "My airplane will arrive at 20:10 p.m.

    I certainly hope that there will be no delays. When I land, I will try to take the first train to get to your house."

    If that doesn't work for you then just removing "after that time"entirely and leaving the rest of the paragraph as is.

    2."I would like to ask for advice ON WHAT TRANSPORTATION I SHOULD TAKE to get to your house." works better.

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